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Bonding to Existing Concrete

posted by Bob Monday, November 22, 2010 at 12:00 PM

Fact: Fresh wet concrete does not normally bond well to existing dry concrete. Do you remember elementary school where one of the subjects on which you were graded was “plays well with others”? Concrete would have gotten an F. There is nothing in basic portland cement that will act as a bonding agent. Portland cement concrete works well in mass and provides great compressive strength but not bond.

Concrete is marvelous stuff but in time it will deteriorate. When it does you either have to patch it or replace it. Assuming that it is structurally sound the least expensive alternative is to patch it. However patching it requires some attention to detail or your patch will not last. So that you don’t waste too much time or money we should probably discuss what “structurally sound” means. If your sidewalk has either heaved or dropped at almost every joint, repairing it will not provide a long term solution. The slabs are likely still moving. If your slab has so much sand and gravel on the surface that despite sweeping and sweeping and squirting and squirting it just keeps coming back, don’t waste your time on repairs. If you have multiple cracks that run so deep that they appear to run through the slab, a repair would only be temporary. The solution to all of these problems involves a jack hammer and bags of one of the Sakrete concretes.

Since this discussion is on the best way to bond concrete we will assume that your slab is good.

There are a variety of Sakrete concrete repair products available to fix concrete that has begun to deteriorate. However without good surface preparation, none of them are going to perform satisfactorily. All loose sand, gravel, dirt, leaves etc. must be removed. This can typically be done with a garden hose and a good nozzle. Tough areas may require a pressure washer or mechanical abrasion. The two toughest areas to cover are those with oil and tree sap. Both of these will work their way down into the concrete. Simply washing the surface isn’t sufficient. If the stains do not run too deep you can chip away the concrete using a hammer and chisel. Don’t forget the goggles (not just glasses) as this process will throw concrete all over the place. Also keep your thumb out of the way. If the spots are too large or too deep for this to be practical you may need a sealer to cover the stains before patching.

There are two basic methods for bonding a portland cement based product to existing concrete; 1) chemically and 2) mechanically.

Let’s discuss the mechanical approach first since it is really used in both approaches. The most effective way to ensure a really good bond is with a scratch coat. This is simply a very wet coat made up by mixing the repair product with water. Mix up a small amount of the repair material to a soupy consistency. You don’t need to measure the water-just turn the stuff into slop. Then, using a gloved hand or a rag, smear the material onto the area to be patched. Just think finger painting from kindergarten. The technique is about the same. Apply pressure to ensure that as much as possible is shoved into the nocks and crannies. You only need a thin coat. It is not necessary for this scratch coat to dry. By the time you get the repair material mixed it will be ready. Then mix up additional repair material to the proper consistency and apply over this thin scratch coat.

The chemical approach involved mixing up a liquid bonding agent that helps bond new concrete products to old. Products like Sakrete Top n Bond and Sakrete Flo-Coat already contain polymers that greatly improve the bond of portland cement and should NEVER be used with a liquid bonding agent. I know in America bigger is better but it just ain’t so with these products. Other products like Sakrete Sand Mix and Sakrete Fast Set Cement Patcher benefit from the use of a liquid chemical bonding agent such as Sakrete Bonder/Fortifier. When you use a liquid bonding agent, paint the bonder onto the existing concrete and allow it to dry until it is tacky. This usually takes only a few minutes. Then apply the repair material. Just as in the process described above, after the bonder has become tacky apply a scratch coat and then apply the repair material. The most effective way to ensure that the bonding agent gets into the existing concrete is to apply it directly using a brush or rag. It can be sprayed if you happen to have a sprayer. Although the directions say that you can use it as part of the mix water, direct application works better.

If you are doing a large area and a scratch coat isn’t practical you will need to spray the surface with water before you apply the repair material. On a warm day the existing concrete surface will be hot enough to suck the water our of the repair material. In addition some concretes are quite porous and will also rob water from your repair material. If too much water is lost into the old concrete there will not be enough water to hydrate all of the cement particles and a lower strength material will be the result.

There are some substances that concrete simply will not bond to. Paint, oil, glue from old flooring tiles are just a few. You must mechanically remove these materials if you want the job to last.

Once the job is complete you can do a quick check to see if the bond was successful. Wait at least 24 hours and then tap “gently” on the patch using a hammer or some other dull object and listen for a hollow echoing sound. If you just get a dull thud then the material has bonded well. If you get a hollow sound, the material has not bonded and will crack in time. Which means it is back to the beginning of today’s topic. Here is hoping your concrete work comes across as a dull thud (not like some of my party guests) rather than a hollow endeavor.

.

USER COMMENTS

No comments for all the above. I do have a question though. What's your opinion about restoring residential garage floor with the flowing material? I have to mention salt-chipping surface from road salt. Thank you.
- Stavros
Friday, February 11, 2011 at 8:00 PM

Stavros, You can repair your garage floor with the Flow Coat Concrete Resurfacer. This material can be placed from 1/2" down to a featheredge in one lift. You will need to make sure that the surface of the the floor is clean and free of any loose material, dust, debris, paints, and sealers. If you need anything else please feel free to call us at 1-866-SAKRETE and we will be glad to assist you.
- Lee
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 at 9:01 AM

Where can I get a bag of scratch coat?
- Brian
Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 11:46 AM

As stated above... "This is simply a very wet coat made up by mixing the repair product with water. Mix up a small amount of the repair material to a soupy consistency. You don’t need to measure the water-just turn the stuff into slop." The scratch coat is not a special bagged product.
- slw
Monday, March 28, 2011 at 11:38 AM

My front porch has edge worn off severely. I mean edge is worn off back 3 inches or more in some places. Lowes guy told me to get Bonding agent and Sakrete sand mix. So here is my plan: I have chipped off and swept off all loose material. I will lightly spray off dust with garden hose. Apply bonding agent. Apply scratch coat. Quickly place a board up against porch edge (bottom is still intact) and place blocks against to hold in place. Mix up and apply the repair material. Does this sound right?
- Fred
Tuesday, April 5, 2011 at 8:03 PM

Fred, in order to recommend the correct Sakrete products we need to gather additional information on your project. Could you please contact our Technical Service Department at 1-866-SAKRETE. There are many variables with your application that we would like to discuss prior to recommending a product.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, April 6, 2011 at 12:14 PM

My patio got a crack in it last year when the weather was extremely hot for my area. I don't want to tear up all the concrete. Can I just put down about an inch layer of new concrete over it. I was thinking using the crack resistant cement. The slab is about a 10x12. Would it be feasable to fix this way?
- Dan Williams
Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at 1:07 AM

Dan, We would not recommend applying a 1" layer of Crack Resistant Concrete over the existing cracked slab. If you were to apply the material without addressing the crack then it could easily crack again. Please contact us at 1-866-SAKRETE to speak with one of our Technical Service Representatives for more information on correct repair materials.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 11:15 AM

Crack Resistant is a concrete mix and would'nt be used for anything under 2 inches...really I would'nt use for anything under 3 inch..
- Joe
Monday, April 25, 2011 at 3:31 PM

My patio has pulled away from the house and dropped about about an inch. There is now a 6 inch gab between the house and patio. Is there any way to repair this without redoing the whole patio?
- Tom Waters
Tuesday, July 5, 2011 at 6:34 PM

Tom, due to the fact that there is movement in the patio any repairs may only be temporary. It would be recommended to address the cause of movement prior to any repairs. It could be that there is not a proper drainage bed under the patio which has caused it to move. Any materials placed over the patio will not prevent further movement and cracking could occur.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, July 6, 2011 at 10:37 AM

I have a concrete exterior stairs with a verticle side wall going down to my basement. The top 2 stairs but to the foundation and have gaps in the edges to the foundation allowing water to leak through when ground water rises, and the side wall has cracked away about .75" showing ruff stones now. I want to patch both areas and wa thinking about your top and bond product for this repair?
- chuck
Sunday, August 28, 2011 at 2:15 PM

Chuck, for your application we would recommend using a polyurethane product like the Sakrete Non-Sag Sealant that has some flexibility. You can try using the Top'n Bond however it will require more maintenence than the Non-Sag Sealant since it is a rigid material and may crack again if theres any movement. The gaps will need to be filled in with backer rod prior to applying the Non-Sag Sealant and the depth should be no more than 1/2".
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, August 29, 2011 at 10:50 AM

Can I send you a photo of my concrete stairs and perhaps recommend a product to repair?
- Arlene
Monday, September 19, 2011 at 4:50 PM

Absolutely, if you select "Share Your Project" under the Contact Us drop down box at the top of the page you are able to attach photos of your project. It will then be sent to the Sakrete technical service department where we will be able to assist you.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, September 20, 2011 at 10:42 AM

What is teh difference between Top N Bond and Flo Coat? I need to resurface my patio.
- James
Wednesday, October 19, 2011 at 12:39 PM

There are actually quite a few differences between the Top'n Bond and the Flo-Coat Resurfacer. The main difference you will notice is with the consistency and application method. Flo-Coat is applied in a flowable consistency with a squeegee while the Top'n Bond will have a thicker consistency and is applied with a trowel. If it is a large project you may want to use the Flo-Coat since it can be applied much easier and for smaller projects and for filling in cracks it may be best to use the Top'n Bond. There is also a difference in the compressive strengths. The Flo-Coat has a compressive strength of 4,500 psi after 28 days while the Top'n Bond will be 5,000 psi. Both products are designed for applications from 1/2" down to a feather edge.
- Dean
Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 11:50 AM

I have built a storage area with a 8ft opening on an existing slab. When it rains the water flows in through the opening. Is there some kind of permanent barrier (two sided ramp)I can adhere to the concrete that can with stand weight and gentle abuse?
- David
Friday, January 20, 2012 at 12:42 PM

David, are you trying to build a concrete ramp?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, January 20, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Yes,I would like to build a ramp. Nothing to big.It would need to be sloped on both sides.
- David
Saturday, January 21, 2012 at 12:16 PM

I have a sloping basement floor that I am levelling prior to tiling. It has an oval depression (to a floor drain) about 6'x10'. I've tried Sakrete sand mix, but it didn't bond (photo), so I removed it. I'm now thinking of using a Latex fortified thin set with a dry pack. The photo shows whats left of the old residual flooring adhesive (black). Should I use a liquid bonding coat as well? What products would you recommend for the thin set and the dry pack?
- Bill
Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 12:04 PM

David, the product you will need to build a ramp will depend on the thickness. If you are wanting to slope it from 1/2" to a featheredge you can use the Top'n Bond. For a larger ramp 2" - 1/2" you can use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher. Make sure the concrete is properly prepared before applying the repair materials, no paints, oil, or anything that will prevent a bond. The Top'n Bond is already modified so no bonding agent is needed but with the Fast Setting Cement Patcher you can brush on some Bonder & Fortifier on the existing concrete to enhance the bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, January 23, 2012 at 9:11 AM

Bill, it sounds like the old flooring adhesive prevented the Sand Mix from bonding properly. The adhesive must be mechanically removed in order to achieve good results. Once all of the adhesive is removed then you can apply the materials. The Sand Mix can be used as a dry pack. Unfortunately we don't manufacture thin set mortars but we do recommend using a ProSpec thin set product. If you have any questions about this please contact us at 1-866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, January 23, 2012 at 10:23 AM

My project is leveling my basement from approximately 1-1/4" to a feather edge. We used 100 bags of top'n bond, we did not rough the surface and we used a bonding agent on the old floor. Obviously the entire 400 square feet did not bond and it shrunk. It was approximately 100 bags of cement. What's upsetting is that the directions on the bag say nothing about not using a bonding agent on the old floor. Directions on the sakrete flo-coat do have directions that say not to use a bonding agent. My new approach is this: - rough the surface with a concrete scarifier - wet the floor overnight but do not produce puddles - use 100 bags of sakrete flo-coat - force a scratch coat into old concrete before pouring new concrete - apply in 1/2" thickness in 24 hour intervals. Will my new approach work? Can I get a discount on my next 100 bags?
- Adam
Saturday, February 18, 2012 at 10:12 PM

Adam, based on the information provided there are a few reasons for why the overlay possibly did not work properly. Surface preparation is very important, and going over a smooth surface will be difficult if it is not roughed up. The Top'n Bond is designed for applications from 1/2" down to a featheredge. Going much thicker than this in one application or adding more than the recommended water can cause shrinkage problems. Also any coatings or sealers will be bond breakers, preventing the Top'n Bond from adhering. Since it is in your basement if the slab has a high moisture content it can cause bonding issues as well. For this type of application it would be best to speak with one of our technical representatives to ensure that we have all the information needed to recommend the right products. You can contact us at 1-866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at 5:15 PM

when can I use Flo-coat on a new concrete walkway? how long does the new concrete needs to cure before flo-coat application. Thanks
- tom
Sunday, April 29, 2012 at 10:34 PM

Tom, when using Sakrete Flo-Coat Resurfacer it is recommended to apply it to cured concrete which would be 28 days.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 4:16 PM

I have an old poured basement from the 1930's and there is a high sand content and the inside walls are spalling all over the place. The base ment is dry and I do not have water problems it just looks really bad. What would you recommend for this type of repair?
- Jeff
Thursday, May 10, 2012 at 10:41 PM

Jeff, back during that time frame ash was commonly used in concrete mixes which could have produced a lower strength concrete and for that reason I would recommend using the Type N Mortar Mix. The surface needs to be prepped really well before hand, make sure you remove any loose material and that it's clean with no paint, grease or coatings. Also, you should apply Sakrete Bonder & Fortifier on the wall to make sure you get a good bond. Keep in mind that this is a patch and if there are any structural issues they should be addressed by a professional.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, May 11, 2012 at 2:41 PM

I looked on the net for definition of frame ash but all that came up was fly ash. Is it the same thing? Do you have an opinion on if it is all right to insulate these types of walls with foam board. Home is in Wisconsin.
- Jeff
Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 10:26 AM

Jeff, sorry for the misunderstanding I just meant during that time frame it was used in concrete. As far as insulating the walls with foam board unfortunately we wouldn't have any recommendations on that.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, May 14, 2012 at 9:39 AM

I asked this question last week under your "comments" tab but have had no response. To repeat: I need to bond some river rock to my existing pond water feature. This rock needs to be placed on some vertical surface and I need a premix product that will adhere on contact. Any suggestions
- Jerry
Saturday, June 23, 2012 at 12:40 PM

Jerry, how large are those stones and what type of substrate are you going over?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, June 25, 2012 at 1:05 PM

I have a patio slab at least one foot deep it had stone on it which I remove to pour concrete over it very solid nothing sinking or raising but have holes in between them is it possible for new concrete to stick I want to stamp it what's the least amount of new concrete I should pour thx
- Sneyder
Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 1:08 PM

can you stamp flo-coat?
- liz
Sunday, July 15, 2012 at 10:37 AM

I want alter my garage floor. Currently the concrete floor seems to have been sealed, painted, and even consists of some VCT tile. I want a nice concrete surface that does not get slippey when wet (dangerous for my 2 year old). I want to do it myself and do not know where to start - any suggestions?
- Luke
Monday, July 16, 2012 at 12:59 PM

Sneyder, the surface needs to be prepped properly before placing any concrete. Remove any loose material from the concrete and make sure there is no paint, sealer or anything that will interfere with bonding. A bonding agent should be used over the clean concrete as well. As far as the minimum thickness, it will be determined by the stamp being used, and when using a concrete mix you must maintain at least 2" in thickness.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 10:26 AM

Liz, being that Flo-Coat is applied at a thickness of 1/2" or less it isnt recommended to stamp. It's best to use a material that is used for thicker applications like Concrete Mix
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 10:38 AM

Luke, before resurfacing your garage floor it will need to be properly prepared. Depending on the thickness you could resurface it with the Flo-Coat and put a broom finish to help with traction. All paints and sealers must be removed prior to applying the Flo-Coat, along with the VCT tile and adhesive. Any sealer, paint or adhesive left will affect the bond of Flo-Coat so it's recommended to get down to clean concrete before applying Flo-Coat.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 10:59 AM

Hello, I'm thinking of re-tiling my kitchen, the cement below is somewhat uneven and has imperfections. Is this somewhere I could use flo coat safely or is there another sakrete product I can use ? Much appreciated!
- Shawn
Wednesday, July 18, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Shawn, the product to use in this application would be the Self Leveling Underlayment. It can be used up to 1" in thickness. The concrete must be free of any grease, paint, sealer etc. and primed with the Bonder & Fortifier before applying the Self Leveling Underlayment. If you have any questions about applying the product feel free to call our technical support at 1-866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, July 19, 2012 at 5:14 PM

HI, I have a steel bulkhead unit that sits too close to the ground on a precast set of stairs, and water run off from the patio finds its way in during a heavy rain. I dont want to use block to raise the unit and have mortar joints. Can you recomend a product that will allow me to raise the unit 2-3"? Thanks
- Dan
Monday, July 23, 2012 at 11:46 AM

Dan, to raise the concrete 2-3" you will need to use one of the Sakrete concrete mixes. Concrete is used for applications 2" in thickness and greater. The concrete must be clean and free of any paints, stains and sealers. Bonder & Fortifier should also be applied to the existing concrete prior to placing the fresh concrete to ensure a good bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, July 23, 2012 at 5:07 PM

Our concrete floor in our new home has a dip in it, the builder wants to top it up with a concrete bond to level it off. How long do you think this method will last before having to be redone?
- Blayne
Tuesday, July 24, 2012 at 2:15 PM

Blayne, it's difficult to give an estimate of the longevity of a patch as there are many variables. Surface prep is very important when patching concrete and is a major factor in having a long lasting repair. Also, the type and amount of traffic over the area can have an effect on the longevity.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, July 24, 2012 at 5:19 PM

Used a very thin layer of top and bond to seal a pitted concrete porch (acid etched concrete first), how long do we need to wait before we can paint?
- Marlin
Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 11:50 AM

Marlin, the time you have to wait before painting will depend on the type of paint being used. Typically with latex paints it is recommended to wait at least 7 days and any other type of coatings (oil based, epoxies, etc.) you should wait at least 28 days. You should always consult with the manufacturer of the paint as well, they usually state how long you must wait before using that paint over fresh concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 1:18 PM

Is it true that the moisture percentage in the repair product is somewhat determined by the material being repaired? I seemed to have read that SOMEWHERE. I ask because I have had my concrete steps and the mortar between the bricks on the side of my house repaired 3 times. Lasts less than a year. The last time it lasted less than 2 months-before the snow and the cold came.
- Jahebri
Thursday, August 9, 2012 at 9:43 AM

Jahebri, when applying repair materials over porous substrates it is recommended to dampen the area before placing the repair material. If the concrete is porous it can suck water out of the repair material, not allowing all the cement particles to hydrate which can lead to a weak repair.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, August 10, 2012 at 1:09 PM

I have a set of concrete outside stairs. However the risers are not to code. The first step needs just over an inch added and the second step needs 2 inches added. Is it possible to form up, apply adhesive, then use one of your products? Not sure which one is best.
- Anthony
Sunday, September 16, 2012 at 9:33 PM

Steve, you have a few options to bring the floor up 3". I will contact you and we can discuss the possibilities to level the floor.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, September 17, 2012 at 10:51 AM

Anthony, to apply a 1"-2" layer of concrete over an existing stair you may use the Sakrete Sand Mix which is used for applications requiring 1/2"-2" in thickness. Make sure the concrete is free of any paint, sealers and stains, then apply the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier prior to applying the Sand Mix in order to enhance the bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, September 17, 2012 at 1:21 PM

I have a set of concrete outside stairs. However the risers are not to code. The first step needs just over an inch added and the second step needs 2 inches added. Is it possible to form up, apply adhesive, then use one of your products? Not sure which one is best.
- Anthony
Monday, September 17, 2012 at 7:01 PM

We have 25 feet of concrete walkway that has sunk about 2 inches along one side of its entire length. Can I use Sakrete "Sand mix" to level it to a 1/2" thick edge, and then add one or two coats of "Top'n Bond" as the final leveling coat brought to a feathered edge? Product compatibility, cure times between layers...? How about using "DOT Mix" for initial leveling then Top'n Bond over that? It's rated for 1/2" to 2" thickness @ 10,000 psi, and a 20 minute working time:) Does Sakrete have a similar product? There are no cracks... in the walkway, maybe it's reinforced. It's weathered but not flaking... My thought is that I can add more layers of "Top'n Bond" over the years if this walkway continues to sink (the current problem happened over the past 10+ years) I think it's due to sandy soil and underground water slooowly sinking the slope that the walkway is built along :( PS. I talked to a slabjacking service but it's not a good option here. Thank you, Dave
- Dave
Thursday, September 27, 2012 at 12:45 PM

Dave, yes you can apply the Sakrete Sand Mix to the area that requires 2" down to 1/2" and then finish off the area with Top'n Bond to go down to a featheredge. Make sure the concrete first is very clean and free of any dirt, paint, stains and sealers. Brush the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier onto the existing concrete prior to applying the Sand Mix. Once the Sand Mix sets up and you can't disturb it, you may apply the Top'n Bond over it. You could apply the Sand Mix one day and come back early the next day and finish it with the Top'n Bond, even applying it to the surrounding areas to have a uniform color.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, September 27, 2012 at 4:36 PM

I have a good finished slab for my basement floor, built around 1980. Unfortunately the builder did not place drainage around the outside of the foundation, so that during certain times of year water comes into the basement through the space between the walls and the slab, especially along one wall. digging and installing perimeter drain would obviously be the best but it would be nearly impossible in these particular circumstances. Everyone says to get a jackhammer and dig a trench around the inside perimeter to collect the water and direct it to the floor drain in the low corner ...and to keep it from sheeting across the floor. I think that , given the fact that there would be rebar and wire in the slab it would be a tough go plus the floor is not level so that in some places the trench would end up deeper than the thickness of the slab which would only invite more water in. Is there a product that would bond to the existing slab that I could bed a course of 4 inch blocks or pavers, thus creating a barrier around the outside edge of the slab against the infiltrating water ? Hope someone can help...Thanks...Jay
- Jay
Sunday, October 7, 2012 at 6:18 PM

Jay, when dealing with moisture issues the best way to address them is from the exterior of the house, but that usually isn't the most convenient. For this particular case, placing pavers along the bottom of the wall unfortunately would not stop moisture from passing through. Moisture will find the easiest path to travel so if there isnt a foundation coating on the outside it will be a regular maintenance issue.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, October 9, 2012 at 9:05 AM

I have a milkhouse floor that has a lot of pitting and is uneven with some dips where wter pools. It also doesnt flow well into the drain. what would be the best product to stand up to the frequent moisture/ cleaning/ chemicals that are used here? We are considering possibly tiling.Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
- George
Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 8:45 PM

George, the product to use will be determined by the depth of the pitted areas. If they are fairly shallow (1/2" or less) you could use the Top'n Bond or the Flo-Coat Resurfacer. For deeper repairs (1/2" - 2") the Sakrete Sand Mix or Fast Setting Cement Patcher can be used along with the Bonder & Fortifier. Make sure the concrete is clean prior to resurfacing and free of any paints, sealers, loose material or grease. If you are going to leave the concrete exposed then it would be a good idea to use a sealer to protect it from any chemicals or cleaners that would be used. Typically sealers can be applied once the patching product has cured, usually 28 days.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, October 12, 2012 at 7:51 AM

I have a similar issue as Bill (Jan 22nd). My basement floor slopes 4" towards a drain. I would like to level the floor (approx 12x18)in preparation for tile. People have told me to score the old concrete, others have said a bonding agent. I'd appreciate your thoughts on the materials and method needed. Thanks, Tom
- Tom
Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 12:24 PM

Tom, in order for you to level up the floor 4" you will have to use a few products. First of all, surface prep is very important so make sure the existing surface is cleaned and free from any paints, stains and sealers. For the areas that are greater than 2" in thickness you will need to use a concrete mix, such as the High Strength or the 5000 Plus. Once you get down to 2" in thickness you can use the Sakrete Sand Mix. Then for the thinner application, 1/2" down to a featheredge you will use the Sakrete Top'n Bond. The Top'n Bond is already polymer modified so it does not require a bonding agent however it is recommended to use a bonding agent with the concrete mix and Sand Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 4:49 PM

Thanks for the info Dean!
- Tom
Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 5:49 PM

Sorry Dean, one more question. I was reading the Top'n Bond directions and am I correct that it's suppose to be laid 1/2" at a time? If so, would it have to cure 24 hr between each layer? Thanks!
- Tom
Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 6:00 PM

Tom, It is not necessary to wait 24 hrs.. You only need to wait enough time that will give the first application of Top'n Bond time to set. You want to make certain that when you reapply onto your first layer, that the layer will not be disturbed. 6-8 hrs. would be more than enough time before reapplying. This way the multiple lifts of Top’n Bond will cycle its hydration stage as one. Also, be mindful of the temperatures you’re working in as well when gauging the set. Cooler temperatures will cause longer setting times.
- SLW
Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at 8:28 AM

I have a bathroom with a shower that was built in a corner of the attached garage. We've been here five years and I've watched the floor of the shower crack and sink more every year. I just tore out the shower floor. I don't know what product was used for the floor (under the ceramic tile) but I was able to lift the corner that had sunk and broke the whole shower floor out very easily, no gravel in the mix. The shower walls seem to be cement board and are in good shape and the original concrete garage floor is still solid and crack free. The floor the back wall to the front wall has a thickness of just under an inch and drops to almost two inches. What is the best product and process to replace this slab, should there have been gravel in the mix?
- Stan
Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at 10:26 AM

Stan, it sounds as if you have some settling going on with your garage floor that is caused the irregular pitch in the shower floor. Keep in mind that most garage floors do not have moisture vapor barriers like a house would. There should have been a waterproof liner installed under the shower floor to prevent the water transmission through the slab. At this point there is no certainty to the severity of the damage that has been done to the bedding under the slab. You may have to examine the slab prior to any repairs to be sure that the area is stable enough to support your new shower. Once you have determined that the slab has not been damaged or repairs are made to assure that the slab is stable, you will want to place a waterproof liner in prior to adding your new shower floor. Follow ANSI Guidelines 108.1B and 108.5 and also B415-11 for Shower Receptors in the TCNA handbook (Tile Counsil of North America) for the proper installation of a shower floor. As far as the old floor that you had to rip out, it would appear that someone may have installed a Mortar Mix instead of a Sand Mix or Floor Mud. A Mortar Bed is only the terminology that is used in the industry. However, that does not mean that you should use a Mortar Mix to create a Mortar Bed/ Shower Floor. It does not have the strength to give you long term durability for that type of application. The proper material to use would be the Sakrete Sand Mix which will have a much higher compressive strength and give you the durability that you are looking for. You would mix the Sand Mix to a dry-pack consistency and your maximum depth of the material can be no greater than 2” in thickness. Your pitch from the wall to the drain should be a ¼” per foot for proper drainage. No, you would not use a mix with stones in it for a shower floor application. I know that this is a lot of information so if you would like to discuss it give us a call and we will be glad to help you in any way that we can.
- RLC
Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 8:17 AM

I have just finished a front portch(17.5'x6'). when we finished we found some drastic pooling directly in front of the door. What is the best way to fix the pooling?
- Kevin
Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at 8:41 PM

Kevin, if you have an area that pools and collects water more than likely it is a shallow repair. For shallow repairs (1/2" or less) you may use the Sakrete Top'n Bond or Flo-Coat Resurfacer. It would be recommended to address those low areas first by troweling material over the affected area. Then once that has set and can't be disturbed by a trowel (or a squeegee if you use the Flo-Coat) you can resurface the entire area so that you get a uniform color. Make sure the existing concrete is clean and cured (28 days) before applying the repair material.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, November 1, 2012 at 8:58 AM

Dean, I have a sunken den (carport that was walled in)Concrete was poured in 1970. I have removed a set of brick steps in the room and of course the steps go to the ground. My plan to fill the hole (4 1/2 X 4 1/2 ft) was to drill the sides of the existing pad, insert rebar, and use high strength sakrete to fill the hole to the level of the existing pad. I was also going to put plastic down (not sure if it is under the existing pad) and use a bonding agent on the old concrete face. I also thought about cutting a lip around the existing pad (like a rabbet) to get a better joint between old and new. DO you have any suggestions? I'm not sure whether we will apply a skim coat (to acid stain the floor) or just tile over.
- Terry
Tuesday, November 6, 2012 at 12:33 PM

Terry, placing rebar in the concrete slab would help keep the section from moving, the rebar is usually epoxied in place. Since this was previously a carport more than likely there is not a vapor barrier beneath the slab. Keep in mind that if you do put a barrier under this section there will still be the surrounding areas that may not have a barrier which wouldnt offer full protection from moisture moving up. Also keep in mind that if you tile the floor you should incorporate the joints around this repair in the tile layout.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Also, the spacing, size of rebar and amount of rebar that needs to be placed in the host substrate and extended out of the substrate will be dictated by your local building code.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 10:10 AM

I have an old garage floor that apparently was not poured properly in places. It may frozen or maybe they used a DIY mix and either used dirty aggregate or too large of an aggregate. I can sweep for ever and still get rocks and loose cement. I want to use a resurfacer over the whole garage (the bad spots are not every where) because even the good areas are rough. I suspect that if I power wash the bad areas it will just loosen up more cement and rock. I cannot remove the bad slab and re pour. What is the best way to patch those areas before using a resurfacer?
- Randy
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 10:23 AM

Randy, it sounds like this would be a good application for the Top'n Bond or Flo-Coat Resurfacer. Both those products can be applied up to 1/2" in thickness and can be layered if you need to go thicker. If you are able to sweep up material then that loose material needs to be removed before resurfacing. Pressure washing the loose material will ensure that you get down to solid concrete. If you have any areas that are deeper than 1/2" and you want to patch them before resurfacing then you can use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher which can be used from 1/2" to 2" in one application. It would be recommended to use a bonding agent with the Fast Setting Cement Patcher. The Top'n Bond and Flo-Coat Resurfacer do not need a bonding agent since they are already polymer modified.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 5:03 PM

Can I use top n Bond to level an interior concrete wall prior to tiling. I need to go 5/8 of an inch thick . Do I really need to go 1/2 and 1/8 or can I just do it all in one go? How long must I let it cure before applying crack resistant thinset and tiles.
- Adam
Monday, November 26, 2012 at 1:08 AM

Adam, for this application typically it would be built up with a scratch and brown coat. The Type S Mortar-Stucco Mix would be the product to use and would need to be applied in the two coats, you couldn't apply 5/8" in one lift. Make sure the concrete wall is free of any paints, stains, sealers etc. Also if it is a poured concrete wall it would be recommended to rough up the wall in order to achieve a good bond. Apply the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier prior to the scratch coat to enhance the bond. I would recommend to consult with the manufacturer of the tile and thinset to get their recommendation for going over the scratch and brown coat.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 10:14 AM

My dad installed concrete pillars to hold our fence/wire in place....our neighbour was doing work recently and the machinery broke about five of the concrete pillars...He has offered to get it repaired...what exactly would he need to do to ensure that the pillar stands in place and not break again? Also does old concrete bond to new concrete with just gravel, cement and sand?
- Samantha
Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 4:37 PM

Samantha, the repairs will depend on the severity of the damage. If the concrete that is supporting the fence posts is completely broken it would be a good idea to replace that concrete in order to get the full support needed for the fence. I'd like to get more information on the condition of the concrete, feel free to contact me at 1-866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, December 10, 2012 at 4:34 PM

I am pouring a sidewalk along the footing of my house. Do I need anything between the foundation and the new sidewalk? Felt?
- Bill
Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Bill, it is recommended to put an expansion joint material between the sidewalk and the foundation. This will help keep the concrete from pushing against the foundation if it expands. Sakrete Concrete Expansion Joint could be used for this application.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 4:36 PM

How about expanding a 6" slab by pouring one next to it? Do I treat the edges to ensure proper bonding and if so what product is ideal?
- Marco
Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Marco, if you are wanting to tie the two slabs together typically that will be accomplished by having rebar epoxied into the sides of the existing slab. The spacing, size and amount of rebar that is placed in the existing slab and extending out of the slab will be determined by a local building official.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, December 26, 2012 at 1:29 PM

I'm putting up a rock veneer wall. I've already applied the scratch coat using type s mortar. I also have a lathe installed under that coat. I'm worried that the mortar will not stick well to the scratch coat - can I coat the scratch coat with a liquid bonding agent to help improve the adhesiveness of the mortared rock to the scratch coat? If so - what type of product do you recommend?
- Noel
Thursday, December 27, 2012 at 10:16 AM

Noel, since you already have the scratch coat applied to the wall that should give you a good mechanical bond for the mortar. Applying a bonding agent isnt required, typically in these applications once the scratch coat has hardened you will go ahead and adhere the stone with the mortar. If the scratch coat is very porous then dampen it with water first to prevent it from drawing out moisture from the mortar.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, December 28, 2012 at 2:32 PM

I tried the feather edge stuff and over the winter it all started cracking and coming off.
- mike
Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at 4:39 PM

I am planning on covering a 22' concrete patio slab that has been finished with little pebbles. I am assuming that these have been sealed somehow. Need to level from 3/4" to 2". Would the sand mix work and what is the best bonding agent?
- Richard
Sunday, January 13, 2013 at 9:01 AM

Richard, for resurfacing concrete 3/4" to 2" in thickness the Sakrete Sand Mix is used however with that type of concrete it more than likely has a sealer. The sealer would have to be fully removed in order to use the Sand Mix, once it is removed then the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier would be applied as the bonding agent prior to the Sand Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, January 14, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Removing the pebbles is not a good option as they are really small and well adhered. Can I test to see if it has been sealed? What would happen to the concrete?Otherwise, is there any alternative?
- Richard
Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 4:06 PM

Richard, I would test that area to see if it has been sealed. You can pour some water droplets on the concrete and if it beads up then a sealer is present. Even if the concrete absorbs the water droplets it would be recommended to also pressure wash the concrete to remove any contaminants and loose material. Then you can follow with applying the Bonder & Fortifier and Sand Mix. If the sealer is not removed then it will be a bond breaker and the Sand Mix will not adhere properly.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 4:34 PM

I had a communication error with my contractor and I didn't notice when he formed my garage that the slab was 6' short. He made the last 6 feet a tapered skirt that I wanted but missed the overall length of the foundation. Since this is brand new concrete would a bonding agent work any better than on old concrete. I need to raise the entrance 4" and taper to 1 1/2" over a 6' span. Any help is appreciated.
- jlay
Friday, January 18, 2013 at 5:46 PM

I would recommend to allow the new concrete to cure a minimum of 28 days prior to applying a topping. If you could somehow make the minimum depth of the area to be resurfaced 2" then you could use one of our concrete mixes once the slab has cured 28 days. For any areas that are between 1/2" and 2" the Sakrete Sand Mix should be used. Once cured, apply the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier as a bonding agent on the slab. Since these patched areas may vary in color from the existing slab you may want to apply the Flo-Coat to achieve a surface with a uniform color.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, January 21, 2013 at 5:11 PM

I have a chimney built in 1976. The Crown has cracked in places and has hole in one spot. How should I approach repairing and resufacing the crown? I also have a concrete cap over the chimney. It is not cracked yet so I would like to add a surface to it and seal it so it will last another 30 years. What do you recommend. Thanks
- JB
Monday, January 21, 2013 at 10:25 PM

JB, when repairing the chimney crown a product that can be used is the Sand Mix. It is used from 1/2" to 2". Before applying the Sand Mix any loose material must be removed. In order to bond well you should either do a scrub coat of the Sand Mix or you may use the Bonder & Fortifier. For the concrete cap if you just need to resurface it you may use the Top'n Bond, which is used for 1/2" to featheredge applications and no Bonder & Fortifier is needed. Make sure it is clean first. It needs to cure before sealing so go by the sealer manufacturer's recommended time to cure, many times it will be 28 days.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 1:16 PM

An interior French drain was installed along the wall in my basement 30 years ago. The drain still works fine, but the concrete they used has deteriorated – with areas crumbling like sand- and I have removed it, exposing the 16” x 40’ trench with drainpipe and gravel in it. They laid the drainpipe a bit high and the concrete I removed averages 2” thick. My plan is to remove some gravel, leaving it level with the top of the pipe and install a 3/8” thick dimpled membrane (superseal, made of high density polyethylene) on top (with the dimples facing down) and bent at a right angle to go up the wall to above floor level so water can drain down the wall and into the gravel and pipe. This will leave about 2” for the new concrete. In one or two spots it will be a little less than 2”. My plan is to paint concrete bonder and fortifier on the edge of the existing concrete floor and then use 5000 lb plus to fill/resurface the trench. Is this appropriate? Any suggestions?
- Robert
Thursday, January 31, 2013 at 10:16 AM

Robert, to fill that area you want to make sure that you will be going at least 2" in thickness if you plan to use the Sakrete 5000 Plus. If you are wanting to tie the two sections together that is typically done by epoxying rebar into the sidewalls of the slab that the new concrete will meet. There shouldn't be any issue with using the 5000 Plus there if all you are wanting to do is fill the trench. Feel free to contact us at 1-866-SAKRETE if you have any questions.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, January 31, 2013 at 4:44 PM

The slab in my basement - which I am going to finish - slopes about 1.5 inches into one corner. The slope is from the original construction (1936) and not an on-going problem with settling. The foundation rises up bout 12 inches in this corner. I would like to pour some sort of self-leveling product in this corner, but I'm not sure which one to use. If there is a .5 inch limit to a layer of material, can one pour be layered on top of another, after it has set? Thanks for your help.
- Jeff
Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 10:37 PM

Jeff, yes with many of our products you can add multiple lifts. If you are planning on leaving the concrete exposed with no carpet or tile then you should use a product like the Flo-Coat Resurfacer. It is a flowable material that is placed with a squeegee from 1/2" to a featheredge and can be layered if you need to go more than 1/2". Make sure that the previous layer has set up enough before adding the new layer, which is typically 24 hours.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 2:50 PM

I have a pool that's bordered down one length with a concrete and river rock border that slopes into a planter bed. I would like to build up a curb to create a higher separation to the soil of the planter bed. 1st, will any of the products adhere to the river rock & 2nd is there a maximum thickness that can be used? Recommended products? Thanks.
- Jay
Monday, February 25, 2013 at 12:52 AM

Jay, when applying material over a river rock concrete my concern would be whether there is a sealer present. Many times they seal the river rock and if that's the case then you wouldn't be able to apply any material over it, it wont bond. It's a very difficult product to go over, if you were to mechanically remove the sealer (if there is one present) you would be breaking up a lot of the concrete. How thick of a curb were you planning on building?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, February 25, 2013 at 5:16 PM

I am finishing a garage that slopes 4.5 inches towards the old door. I am having it filled with a mobile mix company that has down to 3/4 inch aggregate in their concrete so I am stopping my forms at 3/4 in then will feather out the rest. I will clean and use your bonder/ fortifier before I have it poured. How long does it take to become tacky and do I need to mix it with portland cement first? Will I need to use the bonder with your featheredge product also?
- jon
Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at 12:32 AM

Jon, for the bond coat you can make a slurry with the Bonder & Fortifier and portland. You would mix 2 parts Bonder & Fortifier with 1 part portland cement, then apply with a brush. It usually only takes a few minutes or so to become tacky. If you are using a polymer modified resurfacer like the Top'n Bond or Flo-Coat then you would not use the bonding agent. Those products are already polymer modified and it's not recommended to use a bonding agent with them.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at 5:10 PM

I have a slow leak at the seam where floor meets wall. It is in a corner where it pools, especially after a hard rain. I want to build a ridge to divert the water toward a floor drain, keeping the water between the curb and the wall. This is not a big river of water I just want to contain it so it does not sheet across the floor. What is your suggestion of product that will adhere to the floor and build up this curb to maybe a 2" height? This is not in an kind of traffic area and just along one wall. Thanks for your suggestion.
- paul
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 6:10 PM

Our plow contractor knocked over a concrete bench and one of its legs was cracked off. I thought of drilling a couple of holes and inserting rebar. What type of adhesive do I use to hold the rebar in place? And how do I bond the two pieces of concrete leg together?
- Ed
Monday, March 11, 2013 at 10:18 AM

I removed crumbling old red brick stem wall down to the footing. I intend to use concrete blocks to repair. The old footing varies several inches from one end to the other and in the middle. What product can I use over the footing to level it all off? I varies about 2".
- Mark
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 7:47 PM

Paul, if you are looking to build a curb up to 2" in thickness you have two options. You can either use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher or the Sand Mix. Both products are used from 1/2" to 2" in thickness. It is recommended to use either a bonding agent like the Bonder & Fortifier or a slurry coat, that way it will bond to the existing concrete. If you have any areas less than 1/2" then Top'n Bond should be used, it is already modified so a bonding agent is not required. Make sure that when you place the material water is not leaking through the crack which could affect the bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Ed, typically when rebar is inserted into concrete it is set with an epoxy. To bond the two pieces together you may have to use a multipurpose epoxy that is used for concrete repair, I would check out your local home improvement store to see if they carry that type of epoxy.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at 10:06 AM

Mark, being that this is a structural issue I would first start by contacting a local building official to get information on what type/strength material they require to raise the level of the footing and also how they recommend tying the two sections together. Once we have that info we can come up with a prodcut recommendation.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at 5:05 PM

I bought several large square "hydrapressed" concrete slabs as part of landscaping our backyard. I like them; they are dense and heavy, but the have a pattern on the top surface from the molding process that does not appeal to me. Can I spread a thin layer of a product like Flow Coat on them to smooth them out? They are brand new and essentially unblemished.
- Jon Heal
Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 6:57 AM

Jon, the Flo-Coat can be applied to the pavers to resurface as long as there are no sealers or coatings on them. It would be best to first wet the block with clean water that way it wont draw out the moisture from the Flo-Coat and then trowel material over the block. Make sure though that any areas wont be over 1/2" in thickness and if you do have areas thicker you can add an additional layer when the first layer hardens.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, April 8, 2013 at 5:07 PM

You say that "The most effective way to ensure a really good bond is with a scratch coat". Is a scratch coat better than a bonding agent? I'm doing an overlay project on top of old condcrete using topping mix. I plan to pressure wash, etch with dilute muriatic acid, neutralize with diluted ammonia, then rinse. Given that muriatic acid is supposed to open the pores, would that allow the scratch coat to penetrate and really bond the old and new concrete? I feel kind of ambivalent about a layer of rubber in between the two layers (ie using an acrylic bonder) - it seems like the scratch coat would make for a more 'integral' bond.
- Kent
Friday, April 12, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Kent, If you are using the Sakrete Sand Mix, Flo-Coat or Top'n Bond as a topping then using an acid to etch the concrete wouldn't be recommended. Sometimes the acids can end up being a bond breaker. Pressure washing would be recommended to remove any dirt and also loose material. A scratch coat is a great way of bonding the new material to the old because you work the slurry coat into the pores of the existing concrete. When using products like the Flo-Coat or Top'n Bond those can not be used with bonding agents since they are already polymer modified but a scratch coat is beneficial.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, April 12, 2013 at 5:11 PM

Thanks very much for the response. (I'm using the sand mix, BTW). I thought that it was important to etch beforehand for a good bond? Doesn't neutralizing the muriatic acid afterward and then rinsing remove any problem with the acid interfering with the bond? If my Sand mix is quite thin (1/4" to 1/2"), should I be adding a fortifier to it? - I was going to use Sika Ultimate Fortifier as that's what's available where I bought the sakrete Sand Mix.
- Kent
Friday, April 12, 2013 at 6:48 PM

If you are going 1/4" to 1/2" then the Top'n Bond or Flo-Coat would be recommended for that thickness. The Sand Mix is used for applications 1/2" to 2" in thickness. It's best to use the Top'n Bond or the Flo-Coat, those are polymer modified and designed for thinner applications 1/2" to a featheredge. When using those products all that is recommended is to pressure wash the existing concrete to remove loose material and dirt. Also make sure there are no coatings such as paints, stains or sealers. Acid etching is quite popular for stains and coatings however it's not a recommended prep technique for Sakrete resurfacers.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 8:23 AM

Our subcontractor did a poor job of stamping the concrete on the front & back porches of our new home. He proposes to pour a new layer of concrete on top of that one & stamp it again. This would bring the porches level with the door jambs. What do you think?
- Joe
Wednesday, April 17, 2013 at 10:12 AM

Joe, my concern with that would be whether or not there was a sealer applied to the concrete. Many times with stamped concrete there is a sealer applied, if so then more than likely the new overlay won't be able to bond to the stamped concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, April 19, 2013 at 4:12 PM

I had my outside walkway ,entry cement painted with patterns and was sealed 4 yrs ago it was a bad idea I would like to strip it clean to its original look do you have a recipe for this procedure
- Robert
Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 7:04 PM

I have a charcoal gray stamped patio that has a dip in the concrete. The color is through out the mix. Is there anything I can use to repair this problem while maintaining the color and will it bond?
- DON
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 8:12 AM

Hi there. We have a very large sinking crack in a "raised" front porch. We need to patch it, however, are afraid any type of patching may end up cracking in the same area. We need some type of lightweight concrete since we do not want to very minimal of weight on this. Where do we start??
- Lilly
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 11:23 AM

Robert, if you plan on removing the existing paint from the concrete walkway then you may want to use a paint stripper specifically made for these type of applications. This would be recommended if you are only planning on keeping it as the existing concrete. If you plan on resurfacing the concrete with a Sakrete product afterwards then a cleaner wouldnt be recommended as it can be a bond breaker. You would have to mechanically get down to clean concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 4:49 PM

Don, if you were to resurface that area more than likely the color would not be an exact match. Another thing to keep in mind is that many times a sealer is applied over stamped concrete so trying to get any patch to bond will be difficult.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 5:00 PM

Lilly, a good place to start is first determining the thickness of the repair. Depending on the thickness that will determine the product to use. For overall resurfacing projects the Flo-Coat and Top'n Bond are used often. These go from 1/2" down to a featheredge. It sounds like there could be some settlement which caused that sinking crack, keep in mind that if there is any more movement that any concrete patch you apply could crack. For deeper (1/2" - 2") you can use the Sand Mix or Fast Setting Cement Patcher. With these two it's recommended to apply a bonding agent prior to resurfacing in order to bond to the existing concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 5:05 PM

My basement has the Beaver system in it. It is the plastic channeling that gets epoxied to the floor. It channels water along the walls to a drain. Unfortunately the epoxy is lifting from the floor and we have bad leaking and now mold issues. Had to gut the finished basement. I do NOT want to re epoxy it. I would like to leave the plastic tracking where it is, clean up the concrete properly and pour a 2" x 2" cement retainer all the way around the basement edges. What products do u recomend to adhere the new concrete to the old, plus i would like to make sure it isnt porous to a point where water seeps thru. Thank u for ur time.
- Jay
Thursday, May 2, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Jay, if you have an application where you have to go 2" x 2" you can use the Sand Mix as long as it doesnt exceed 2". It sounds like there is a moisture issue, if the moisture levels are too high more than likely the topping will not bond. Keep in mind that the Sand Mix is a porous material and is not waterproof. The Concrete Bonder & Fortifier is used for Sand Mix applications as a bonding agent to enhance the bond between the Sand Mix and existing concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, May 3, 2013 at 4:23 PM

I have an existing concrete pathway,but want to add some curves to the sides of it by extending the either side out to meet the driveway. I was thinking it would be easy just pur new concrete on either side and match to the level of exisiting but now I am worried. Do I need to do something to the old concrete or at least the sides that will be touching the new addition??
- rebecca
Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at 3:06 PM

Rebecca, for your application you may want to use the Sakrete Concrete Expansion Joint. The expansion joint material helps avoid slab cracking and keeps the concrete from pushing against the existing concrete. If you pour directly up against the existing concrete more than likely a crack will occur along the two sections due to the expansion/contraction of the two slabs.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 9:30 AM

I have an existing concrete pathway,but want to add some curves to the sides of it by extending the either side out to meet the driveway. I was thinking it would be easy just pur new concrete on either side and match to the level of exisiting but now I am worried. Do I need to do something to the old concrete or at least the sides that will be touching the new addition??
- rebecca
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 10:49 AM

Thanks Dean. Let's hope it's not way over our head. I would like to hire a handyman that knows about concrete to work along with us than hire someone to do it. Here's hoping-it looks good in my head :)
- rebecca
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 10:51 AM

I did a crappy job finishing a concrete slab - but at the time it didnt matter - Now I want it nicer because we enclosed it and made a room. What should I use to level and smooth out the old slab burnshaw@timberframe1.com
- Greg
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 5:40 PM

Greg, for your application the Flo-Coat would be a good product to use. It is used for resurfacing old concrete from 1/2" down to a featheredge. Make sure that the concrete is clean and there aren't any coatings on it prior to using the Flo-Coat. It is a flowable resurfacer that is applied using a squeegee.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Hello Sakrete, I was doing my first conrete job and realized I've run into a problem. I wanted to do I smooth concrete step about 3' x 5' with brick border. I framed it, set the sand and tapped it down tight. Then I postioned the brick and started to mix my conrete. When I finished mixing I noticed the mix was as the instructions called for and it was quite rocky. I wanted a smooth surface top. I worked my concrete in between the bricks and 3 x 5 slab area. I left about an inch to go before it would be at the height of the brick tops. It has set and the are is quite rocky and uneven. I want to put a smooth layer over this area and have it be like a white sidewalk still exposing the brick border. I can send a pic if needed. What product and method should I use. Thanks.
- Marshall S
Monday, May 13, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Marshall, for your application it would be great if you would send us a picture so we can see exactly what you have going on with the slab. If you go to the "Contact Us" section and then click on "Share Your Project" you are able to attach a picture. We look forward to hearing from you.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, May 13, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Hello Dean, I did put my project in Share your Project as you asked. Now what?
- Marshall S
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 12:21 PM

Hi Marshall, thank you for sending the email. I have forwarded that to the area rep for our Licensee in your area which is EZ Mix. They manufacture Sakrete and I have confirmed with them that the rep will contact you today.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 4:11 PM

I have a 4 foot walk on the side of my house that is 30 feet long. It is attached to the house foundation. I had the house elevated because of flooding and would like to elevate the walk around 4 inches. The walk is not cracked and stood up well to a bulldozer that was used to put in steel beams to raise the house. A contractor was called about putting in a new walk over the old and he insists it must be broken up with a jack hammer. I would like to do the pour myself, as I have done many concrete jobs. Questions: 1. Should I break up the old concrete that is in perfect condition and pour over it? 2. Would it be permissible to do a scratch coat then do the pour? 3. Should I insert and epoxy or cement short pieces of #5 rebar and would every two feet be enough? It would be placed two feet in from the edge from either side and every 2 feet for the 30 feet. Probably too much to answer but any response would help. I have room to raise the walk 4" and it would drain better to the lower adjoining ground.
- Don J
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 7:49 PM

The exterior concrete of my house (3 ft area from where the stucco ends to the ground surface) has lots of sandy coloration to it. I had it professionally cleaned, but it didn't whiten it up any. I was wondering if I could apply a new layer of concrete on top of this (possibly white cement). Will this work?
- Rob
Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 7:47 AM

Don, for your application applying the concrete over the existing slab is possible. Gravity is helping you out, since you are going 4" in depth the weight of the concrete will help hold it down. Make sure that prior to placing the concrete that the existing concrete is cleaned well and there is nothing that will interfere with a bond. A slurry coat is needed to help bond to the old concrete, working it into the pores will ensure a good bond. Reinforcement would be recommended as well and don't forget to incorporate joints into the walkway, if the concrete has joints right now you can mirror those joint into the topping.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 4:37 PM

Rob, it wouldn't be recommended to apply just a white cement to the stucco wall. You would need to apply a stucco, the stucco will be a mixture of sand and cement and depending on the color you are looking for pigments are added as well. Make sure that the existing stucco is cleaned well. If you have any additional questions feel free to call us at 866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Dean, I don't want to apply the cement to the stucco wall. I want to apply it to the concrete perimeter that is below it. There is about a 3ft high perimeter around the house from the ground to where the stucco begins that is just concrete.
- Rob
Friday, May 17, 2013 at 7:06 AM

Rob, for the concrete portion of the wall it would be recommended to use a stucco mix as well, portland cement just by itself isn't recommended to be used as a finish surface.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, May 17, 2013 at 4:21 PM

We have a huge concrete front porch that wraps around 1/2 of our home. Two sections of it has sunk intowards the home but the outer edge seems to be remaining like it was.After checking what can be done I saw on HGTV them using pea size rock with, they said "2 pars of Epoxy". My question is: Could we use this mixture of rock and Epoxy to fill in the drop that is happening from the house out and let dry and then go back and put a 2 inch coat of pea stone and Epoxy mix over that first mix and would it hold on the concrete if we have prepared the porch in the proper way?
- Cornice
Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 4:25 PM

Cornice, unfortunately here at Sakrete we don't offer any epoxy repair materials so I wouldnt be able to offer any advice. It would be best to speak to a company that specializes in those types of products.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, May 20, 2013 at 5:04 PM

Hi Dean, I've recently replaced a sliding glass door with a 6' pre-hung French Door. This room used to be a garage and the previous owners enclosed it in for another master bedroom (or in-law suite). The wall where the French door was installed is where the garage door used to be. The driveway slopes downward from that wall. Right now, the exterior edge of the french door threshold has a gap about 1.5" from the edge of the former driveway. I'd like to fill underneath the threshold with concrete as well as feather the concrete out so there isn't a lip. What do you recommend in this situation? I was thinking of mixing the concrete thick so I could pack it in under the threshold. However, I'm not sure as to how I should bind the new concrete against the old. Any suggestions? one other option is to rip down a pressure treated 2x4 which isn't nearly as good as concrete. Thanks!
- Andy
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 at 11:34 PM

Andy, for this application you may have to use a combination of two different products. The first one is the Sand Mix; it can be used in the deeper areas from ½” up to 2" in depth. The second is the Top N' Bond; this is the finishing product that can be used from a featheredge to ½” in depth. As for the bonding of the new concrete to the old, use the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier, it should be used with the Sand Mix only, the Top N' Bond does not require a bonding agent. So a basic step-by-step installation would be; clean the area leaving nothing behind that could be a bond breaker, prime the surface to receive the Sand Mix, install the Sand Mix from a minimum of ½” to your needed depth of 1 ½” and then install the Top N, Bond over the entire surface, once the Sand Mix has dried enough to the touch, down to a featheredge. If you have any additional questions feel free to call us at 866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 7:40 AM

I want to lay 1 1/2 river rock in my front yard. I received a noticed from the city that this size is not allowed unless it is grouted sakrete. Would you suggest doing this and if so- how much would you suggest adding?
- Brenda
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 10:07 PM

Hi Brenda, are the river rocks the small 1 1/2 inch rocks or the larger 1 1/2 foot rocks? Also what are you planning on laying the stones over? What type of base do you have?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 4:56 PM

HI Dean- So I am just covering weeds and dirt..I guess just landscaping my yard. So I don't have a base, just the weeds, dirt and the weed cover. It is some law we have here that you can't have that size 1 1/2 inch rocks unless you "sprinkle" sakrete over it. Thanks
- Brenda
Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 7:11 PM

Brenda, unfortunately I haven't heard of Sakrete being sprinkled over river rocks in this way. I would be concerned with the material holding the stones in place properly.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, May 31, 2013 at 5:03 PM

Yes I have a driveway I would like to resurface has one crack in it with the best method to use to resurface the driveway
- Robin
Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Robin, if you have a concrete driveway the product to use would be the Flo-Coat Concrete Resurfacer. It is used from 1/2" down to a featheredge. If you have a crack I would recommend to mix some of the Flo-Coat at a trowelable consistency and trowel it into the crack. Once that repair hardens, then you can proceed with resurfacing. Preparation is very important, make sure that the area has been cleaned (pressure washer) and there are no paints, stains or sealers present before applying the Flo-Coat.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Dean, I have a 1920's home with a large crack, 3/4", in the foundation. The engineer said all was well but I would like to repair it so my house doesn't look like it is about to fall down. I don't think the house is settling anymore per the engineer. I was going to use high psi concrete to fill and float over this crack using the technique described above. Am I missing anything?
- Taylor
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 12:37 AM

I have to increase the height of wall of concrete drain.The top width is 150 mm.suggest solution for applying for bonding on the top for new concrete wall about 600 mm height.
- kokandakar shankar
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 2:28 AM

We have a people coat around the pool. It is tough on our feet. Is there a way to coat over it, or does the slab have to be removed?
- Mark g
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 12:15 PM

Taylor, for your application I would recommend to use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher to fill in the crack. Make sure it is cleaned out first and then mix a slurry coat of the Fast Setting Cement Patcher and brush it into the crack. While the slurry coat is still wet trowel in the patching material. Keep in mind if there is any more movement it can transfer through the repair material and cause it to crack.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 3:11 PM

Kokandakar, the repair material that you use to increase the height of the wall will determine what to use as a bond coat. Typically either a slurry coat or a bonding agent will be used. Some polymer modified materials only recommend the use of a slurry coat whereas materials that are not modified recommend a liquid bonding agent. A general rule is that a slurry coat will be sufficient as the bond coat for repair materials.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 3:20 PM

Mark, If you are planning on using a product like the Flo-Coat or Top'n Bond it is not recommended to go over coatings such as paints, stains or sealers. If there is a coating similar to the ones previously listed it would be recommended to get down to clean concrete prior to resurfacing.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 3:25 PM

Dean, the pebble coat is not sealed. Is it recommended to clean the surface with any cleaner prior to resurface? How long should the resurface last? I'm worried the top coat will separate from the pebble coat over time. Thanks.
- Mark G
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at 3:17 AM

I am thinking of resurfacing my concrete steps with sand pebbles or something of similar size depending on color. The steps are structurley sound. What product is recommended for achieving this and after this task is completed what would be a recommended sealer? I know some concrete finishers but they all have a difference of opinion. Thank you of the bat.
- anthony
Thursday, June 13, 2013 at 1:04 AM

Mark, I wouldn't use a chemical to clean the surface with, a pressure washer is recommended, that way you aren't introducing any other materials which could affect the bond. My only concern with this application would be how smooth the surface is, if the surface is very smooth it may be hard to achieve a good bond whereas a rough texture would allow the Flo-Coat or Top'n Bond to bond well. If you want to discuss this in more detail feel free to call us at 866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, June 13, 2013 at 5:02 PM

Hi Anthony, unfortunately we wouldn't have any products that could be used for a pebble overlay and to seal them in place.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, June 13, 2013 at 5:06 PM

I have a laundry room that has concrete that was poured at three or four different timeframes/eras. I would like to raise the floor and get it all level. Near the exterior door, to level the floor will take about 3/4 inch. About 3 feet in from the door, it will be 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Way across the room, over the old patio slab, around 3.5 inches. What would be my best approach? Also, the 3.5 inch old slab was finished very smooth. Should I install rebar to hold it in place, even though it is an interior four sided, non structural project. Will only support the washer/dryer and foot traffic. My wife wants to cover it with vinyl flooring or some other material.
- John
Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 11:21 AM

John, the product to use will depend on the thickness that you need to apply it. Starting with the area 1/4" to 1/2" you will need to use the Top'n Bond. For areas that go from 1/2" to 2" in thickness you can use the Sand Mix or Fast Setting Cement Patcher (Sand Mix will give you a longer working time so depending on the size of the area you may want to use that) and then for areas deeper than 2" a concrete mix should be used, for this application the High Strength Concrete Mix will work. Make sure the concrete is clean and there aren't any paints or anything that will interfere with the bond. For the deeper area since that slab has a very slick surface it would be a good idea to roughen it up mechanically to give it a good profile, which will allow the Concrete Mix to bond well. The Top'n Bond is polymer modified so a bonding agent isnt needed but for the Sand Mix and Concrete Mix I would apply the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier to the existing concrete prior to applying the material.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 5:08 PM

Years ago when a building, which connects to the school by a concrete slab, was being built, someone scratched profanity into the slab directly in front of the entrance. What can I do to fill in and hide the profanity?
- Debbie
Sunday, June 23, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Ok.here's the situation I poured a walkway and about an hour after I was done a thunderstorm came through and ruined my finish...what product can I use to repair the finish of new concrete
- Joe
Monday, June 24, 2013 at 5:52 AM

Debbie, for that application you can trowel in those areas with the Top'n Bond. Make sure the concrete is clean first and then the Top'n Bond can be troweled over the area.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 at 11:14 AM

Joe, the product that would work best for your walkway would be the Flo-Coat Resurfacer. If the slab was recently poured it would be recommended to allow it to fully cure for 28 days before using the Flo-Coat. If there is a soft surface or any loose material I would make sure that you get down to solid concrete, that way you will be able to achieve a good bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 at 12:27 PM

Dean, I would like to acid stain my front porch, but the concrete is forty years old and needs a few minor patches which may take stain differently. I was thinking to do the repairs, then resurface with flo-coat before staining. Does this sound like a good approach? Will flo-coat take an acid stain? Thanks!
- Sandy
Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 11:31 PM

Dean, I would like to acid stain my front porch, but the concrete is forty years old and needs a few minor patches which may take stain differently. I was thinking to do the repairs, then resurface with flo-coat before staining. Does this sound like a good approach? Will flo-coat take an acid stain? Thanks!
- Sandy
Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 12:30 AM

Sandy, that sounds good. Many stains will state on the container that patches may show through the stain so by resurfacing the entire area that would ensure a uniform base material. Make sure the existing concrete is cleaned prior to applying the Flo-Coat, pressure washing is recommended. The Flo-Coat will have to cure out prior to staining, the amount of time will be determined by the stain manufacturer.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 9:45 AM

Some of this stuff is really unnecessary just be sure to wet the old concrete well with no puddles. If you are adding more than 2 inches thick make sure you new coat is not overly wet. Also the concrete with added fiberglass is better for this application.
- Truck
Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 5:27 PM

Hi Dean. We just had concrete poured and I wanted a curved driveway and walkway. Unfortunately, when I came home from work, I found that they are both straight with sharp angles. Is it possible to build a curved form and pour enough concrete to cut the corners of the sidewalk and seam the two and if so, what would you recommend?
- April
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 at 10:00 PM

Hi April, for that application if you were to pour new concrete beside the existing concrete that would create a cold joint which down the road could form a crack. If possible using expansion joint material between the sections would eliminate this from occuring, then after building the forms and placing the expasion joint material concrete could be poured in those areas.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, July 5, 2013 at 3:41 PM

On a concrete foundation external corner some of the concrete has broken off & some of the face brick above this corner is hanging unsupported. What products / techniques would your recommend to build back up this concrete corner. The missing concrete extends approx. 1 foot on either side of the corner & is approx. 3" deep at its maximum.
- Dennis
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 at 8:52 AM

Dennis, for this application I would utilize the Fast Setting Cement Patcher. Make sure the concrete is cleaned prior to applying the repair material and if there is any loose material that should be removed as well. Then brush on the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier on the existing concrete to enhance the bond. Being that it goes a little more than 2" in depth you will need to apply it in two layers, allowing the first to harden prior to applying the second lift. Each layer should be no more than 2" in thickness.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 at 5:13 PM

Can I pour steps over a stamped patio? I'm worried about cracking and the bleed through on the colored part. For my plan its easier to do the steps last due to the area location. Plus the dry time when I'm pouring my pad. With stamping and pouring 430 sqft I just Dont think I will have time.
- Bryan
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 at 8:57 PM

I have an old poured foundation and I am trying to fix 2 issues. #1 is that I have some erosion in the foundation on the corners from years of pour rain water run off. What kind of product do you recommend to fix this? #2 is that the outside is a pattern of differnt patch jobs. I would like to put a scratch coat or skim coat to make the outside look uniform - What do you recommend? Thanks
- Brad
Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 12:42 PM

Bryan, when applying fresh concrete over existing concrete you need to make sure there aren't any sealers or coatings in order to bond and with stamped concrete they are typically sealed or stained which would affect the bonding capabilities of the concrete.
- Dean
Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 4:50 PM

Brad, starting with your first repair area the product to use will depend on the application thickness. More than likely you can use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher to repair it. Make sure the area has been cleaned and any loose material needs to be removed. Then, either apply a slurry coat of the Fast Setting Cement Patcher or you can use a bonding agent like the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier as a bond coat prior to applying the material. For the 2nd area you can apply the Type S Mortar Stucco Mix if it is a concrete wall. As in the other repair area prep is important so make sure the wall has been cleaned well, I would use the Bonder & Fortifier to really adhere well to the existing concrete prior to placing the Type S Mortar Stucco Mix.
- Dean
Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 5:05 PM

I am looking at converting a concrete carport that has been screened in for over 40 years. My grandfather built the house in 1964. My question is 3 fold. The slope on the carport (20'x 20') doesn't start until about the last 8 feet and then dives pretty hard from "level" / flat to 1.5 brick layers deeper. So the area needed to fill is 20' x 8' x 3" (tapered to 0") The carport is surrounded by brick wall except for the front which now has a knee-wall with treated 2x as the seat. I am planning on reworking the knee-wall anyhow to provide standard window sizes instead of screen. We are going to make this a semi therm controlled room and replace the screen with regular windows. I am thinking of putting a treated 4x4 on top of the existing wall seat and sealing seams with caulk. The floor has been painted several times and has visible layers. I know this bc it is flaking up. There is also carpet adhesive around the edges of the space. So #1&2 what materials should I use to fill the void to make the floor "level" enough for 12 x 12 tiles and what is the best process? #3 - am I thinking correctly on the front knee-wall base?
- Andy
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 10:33 AM

I need your advice an how to resurface the stairs on my front porch. They are made out of a textured style brick. I would like to cover just the riser and tread part of the stairs. Any ideas on what product to use. Thank you for your help
- Teri
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 5:37 PM

Andy, for your application you will have to begin by removing all of the old paint. The resurfacing material will not work well over a painted surface so you will need to get down to clean concrete. You will have to use a few products for this application due to the range of thickness, which will be the Top'n Bond, Sand Mix and possibly High Strength Concrete Mix. If you could contact us at 1-866-SAKRETE, I would like to go through the prep in detail and application as well as get more information on the knee wall area.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 4:15 PM

Teri, I would start out with pressure washing the stairs, make sure you get all loose material and dirt off the stairs. The Top'n Bond would be the recommended product to use. It is a troweled on material and make sure that when you apply it to really work it into the substrate to achieve a good bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 4:23 PM

I need your advice an how to resurface the stairs on my front porch. They are made out of a textured style brick. I would like to cover just the riser and tread part of the stairs. Any ideas on what product to use. Thank you for your help
- Teri
Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 5:59 PM

I have a commercial bathroom where the floor drain is 2" lower than the finished slab. I am not happy with this difference in depth. I would like to install porcelain plank tile (wood look) in this bathroom and while I am doing this I would like to bring the floor drain up to meet the finished floor. Do you have a product that can bond to existing concrete (1 year old) and go from 2" to feather edge? I have a concrete grinder and the necessary tools to prep the floor. What products would you recommend?
- John
Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 9:24 PM

John, for your application I would either use the Sakrete Sand Mix or the Fast Setting Cement Patcher, depending on how quick of a set time you are looking for. The products have a minimum thickness of 1/2" so if you could make the edge of the repair area 1/2" deep that would be ideal. Make sure the concrete is clean and brush on the Bonder & Fortifier prior to placing the Sand Mix or Fast Setting Cement Patcher.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 5:12 PM

We are the sunk and cracked concrete patio, which causes the rain water flow toward the house. We have called contractors to fix it. Some uses lifting method and some suggests over-coating. Is any difference for these two. I means which way is a better choice to fix the problem
- Jason
Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 7:38 PM

i just spoke to a concrete specialist , he said the if the new slab is bonded to the old one it will crack like crazy paving, because the old one will not move as its cured but the new one will move as it cures. some sort of DPM is needed. this is a 5m by 3m shed base about 3.5 in thick and sloping hope to hear opinions
- qaz
Friday, July 19, 2013 at 5:23 AM

Jason, they are two different methods for addressing settled concrete slabs. Slabjacking as it is commonly called is a procedure that lifts sunken concrete by pumping a grout through the concrete, lifting it from below. An overlay is typically a thin resurfacing coating that is applied over the concrete to make the concrete look new again. It's difficult to say which is better, it's one of those things that depends on the certain project.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, July 19, 2013 at 4:15 PM

Qaz, we need to gather more information on your application, if you could contact us at 866-SAKRETE that will allow us to answer your question.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, July 19, 2013 at 4:17 PM

The finish of my driveway is coming off. Its only a few years old and the slab is sound can I resurface it or do I need to replace the slabs? if I can resurface it do I need to remove all the loose concrete. I ask this because the finish is coming loose in small sections and I don't think a power washer will work.
- James
Sunday, July 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Hello. Two years ago we hired a professional to pour a concrete porch (6X8 feet), some steps down to a landing (also 6X8 feet), and a carport. It was a continuous pour with landing connected to the carport. We had the landing formed 1 1/2 inches below the level of the carport with plans to later mortar in a layer of river rock on the porch, steps and landing. (rocks are 1 to 2" wide by 1/2-1" thick). How do we prepare the existing cement, what mortar do we use, what protective coating to we put on top? Some basic instructions on how to do all of this would be appreciated. thanks for any help or links. Kathy
- kathy
Monday, July 22, 2013 at 11:08 AM

Hi Dean, I have a patio(300 square feet) which is very uneven (up to 1/4" deep in some areas) due to a bad previous repair. I have no cracks and removed all loose concrete and power washed, I now have a solid and clean surface. I plan to wet surface and remove any standing water then use Flo-coat to fill(patch) low areas first without scratch coating entire area. Then come back with an even coat of Flo-coat before patched areas are dry. Am I good?
- John C
Monday, July 22, 2013 at 12:36 PM

James, if everything is sound you can use the Flo-Coat to resurface it. If there are any paints or coatings make sure those are completely removed prior to using the Flo-Coat. A pressure washer will help remove dirt and also any loose material. For cracks or voids those can be filled in with Flo-Coat at a trowelable consistency and once those patches have set then the resurfacing at a flowable consistency can take place.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, July 22, 2013 at 5:04 PM

John, everything sounds good with your application, make sure you let the patched areas set first before you apply the Flo-Coat to resurface the entire area.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, July 22, 2013 at 5:07 PM

Hi Kathy, unfortunately at this time we don't have a mix that is specifically used for exposed aggregate applications.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 12:05 PM

Hi Dean, I have a patio that had a 4'x4' raised section in the middle of it to support Tv antenna. I have chipped this section down to below the larger pad.The depth to be repaired varies from 4" to 1/2". Can I use concrete mix on the deeper parts than sand mix once I get to 2". Can this all be applied at the same time?Is bonding agent required between sand & concrete?
- Paul
Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at 11:28 AM

Hi Paul, you can either use the concrete mix for the deeper areas just like you stated above or you could do two applications of the Sand Mix, building up two layers up to 4". I would do two applicaitons of the Sand Mix, that way you will have the same product and the color will be the same for the entire area. It would be beneficial to add in some Bonder & Fortifier into the mix, you can replace up to 50% of the water with it. It sounds like the concrete is already pretty rough so that is good, also either apply a slurry coat or Bonder & Fortifier before placing your first layer of Sand Mix, that way it will bond well. When placing the first layer of Sand Mix make the finish rough, that way it will give the 2nd layer a good surface to bond to. You can apply the 2nd layer once the 1st layer has hardened and you cant disturb it with a trowel.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at 12:30 PM

Hi Dean, I have a patio that had a 4'x4' raised section in the middle of it to support Tv antenna. I have chipped this section down to below the larger pad.The depth to be repaired varies from 4" to 1/2". Can I use concrete mix on the deeper parts than sand mix once I get to 2". Can this all be applied at the same time?Is bonding agent required between sand & concrete?
- Paul
Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at 1:53 PM

Thanks Dean. Sounds Good.
- Paul
Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at 1:55 PM

I have a natural spring that runs through my basement to a shallow well and continues to flow for another 20 feet before exiting the basement. The entire basement is saturated with moisture during summer and high humidity days. (Unfortunately a dehumidifier in this case is pointless). The spring is routed through parts of the floor by tile pipe and a concrete floor is over that. Some of the tile has collapsed and exposes the spring (along with the occasional fish and salamanders)I want to replace/ repair the concrete around the new replacement pipe. What product or products do you recommend?
- Karen
Saturday, August 10, 2013 at 11:12 PM

I have a 20 x 20 carport that has been closed in and used as a spare room for at least 25 years. When you enter the room there is a step down of 1 1/2 which then slopes to about 2 3/4 inches below grade at the other end. When we purchased the house it had linoleum glued to the slab. About 15 years ago we peeled up the linoleum and glued down indoor/ outdoor carpet. There have never been any moisture issues with the slab. We are turning a portion of the room into our bedroom and want to level it and bring it up to the level of the rest of the house. What products/ techniques no you recommend and how would you recommend we remove the glue residue?
- Bobby
Sunday, August 11, 2013 at 6:30 PM

We have a enclosed sunroom 16' X 25' made with 4 equally sized concrete slabs. When we removed old carpeting, we found the slabs all to be in excellent condition. Our problem is when the previous owners tried to cover the old expansion joints, that are about 1/2" wide and filled with a felt material, their old concrete patch is cracked and chipping away. I would like to clean the old concrete patch out, and need to know what material would be best to cover the felt seam, and then feather out to make about a 6" wide patch. Thank you for your help.
- Ray
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 2:58 PM

I have an 4"x 8'x 12' concrete slab for a shed poured only 6 weeks ago. After setting the shed walls I found that the slab is going out of level by 1-3/4" from one end of the 12' dimension to the other. The walls are not anchored to the slab obviously as I couldn't get them level. I am wondering if a new layer of concrete could be bonded to the existing slab to make it level? If so how thick should the top slab be (i assume more then the 1-3/4" and would it still be okay to anchor the walls with wedge anchors through the new top slab. What do you think? Thanks
- Steve
Friday, August 16, 2013 at 8:07 PM

I have a 10 x 21' cement patio outside that was previously painted about 6 years ago. I want to recoat it with Floor Tex but there are several low spots about 1/8" deep that puddles and I wanted to level those out before I recoat. I went to Home Depot and the guy said I needed Sakrete trowl grade B-1 leveler & underlayment. When I got home and looked at the bag it states Interior use. What do you suggest to fill in these low spots? Thanks
- Marilyn
Sunday, August 18, 2013 at 1:03 AM

Karen, it's not a typical application but if you need a general concrete mix to fill the area above the pipe, and you can ensure that the pipe can support the weight then the Sakrete High Strength Concrete Mix can be used.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 4:50 PM

Bobby, for your application starting with the prep, the adhesive will need to be mechanically removed by either scarifying or shot blasting. Acid etching, adhesive removers and chemicals aren't recommended because those can be bond breakers for the repair/leveling material. As far as the products to use I would recommend the Sand Mix along with the Bonder & Fortifier. Once the adhesive is removed and the clean concrete is exposed apply the Bonder & Fortifier as a bonding agent and then the Sand Mix. The Sand Mix will need to be applied in two lifts since it exceeds 2". Once the first lift hardens and sets then the second lift of Sand Mix can be applied.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 5:05 PM

Ray, you may be better off filling in the expansion joints with a flexible sealant such as a Polyurethane Sealant. If there is an expansion joint material (felt) in the joint already then a rigid repair material will more than likely crack if there is movement in that slab. You can resurface the tops of the slabs with the Top'n Bond or Flo-Coat but it's best to honor those expansion joints.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 at 11:19 AM

Steve, this sounds like it could be a settlement issue. If so, then it is a great amount of settling this early on. If you were to apply a topping and then drill into it (even at around 2") my concern would be that it could crack or become an issue where the topping meets the substrate.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 at 2:27 PM

We put down exposed aggregate for a new patio but in didn't turn out to well in one area there is hollows where the aggregate was wash out.it looks terrilble so we a going to fix it what product could I do
- Craig
Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 4:45 AM

My husband recently built a reataing wall using formed reataining wall blocks. Next he is going to pour a small (about 4 ft. by 4 ft.) slab at the bottom of the deck stairs that will interface with a four foot section of the wall. He plans to pour right up to the wall. I think this will not look good and I'm concerned about drainage and expansion & contraction possibly doing damage to the wall. On the other part of the wall that was built next to an existing slab there is a slight gap that was filled with pea gravel. It looks very nice and can drain easily. My suggestion was to stand three or four thicknesses of cardboard up next to the wall before he pours. Once the slab had dried, he can easily remove the pieces nearest the wall and if the one touching the concrete won't come loose, it can be cut off below the top of the slab and will eventually disintegrate. The cardboard will protect the wall from any splattering and will leave a nice narrow "ditch" to be filled with pea gravel. What do you think? Thanks! Deb
- Deb
Friday, August 23, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Craig, unfortunately at this time we do not have any products specifically for repairs to exposed aggregate concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, August 23, 2013 at 2:20 PM

Deb, for that application that is an option if it has worked well for you in the past. You could also keep the wall and the new concrete pour seperate by placing an expansion joint material between the two. This will help keep the concrete from pushing directly against the wall if there is any movement.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, August 23, 2013 at 5:01 PM

Thank you, Dean!
- Deb
Friday, August 23, 2013 at 5:48 PM

Just had new drain and weeping tile put in the basement bath area.Plumber didn't bust out the old concrete in the total area and there was a 2.5 in variance in height towards Centre of room still after they repoured left to deal with.He was advised to use the sand concrete mix to build it up but there is now two areas with air pockets? under it.I believe he was advised to use a Acry-Lok system before the sand mix was applied.He hasn't been back to fix it but busted out one of the areas.Any suggestions as to the next step to take as I have to get this project completed asap and some flooring down as its the bathroom for my business.Will busting out the other bad area and trying again in those areas with the sand concrete be viable or will it still bond with the recently poured stuff? don't want to waste more money unnecessarily and still have it not work..Need options please.4B6UKA
- dale
Saturday, August 24, 2013 at 9:53 AM

Wow lots of posts here. I believe I can use one of these to level my front porch. Previous owners' DIY job left dips and negative slope. But I have two questions: I'm a 57 year old woman, so can I handle this? And what do I need to mix with, equipment wise? I'm thinking five gallon bucket, heavy duty drill and mixing paddle with extension? My dad used a wheelbarrow and a garden hoe to mix stuff like this. I doubt that will be good enough for this. Lol Thanks.
- Teresa
Saturday, August 24, 2013 at 5:04 PM

Dale, it sounds like the area that was poured did not bond properly. When that material was pulled up could you see if there were any contaminants on the surface of the existing concrete? Also how long has the existing slab been there?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Teresa, which product will you be mixing? Sounds like you may be using the Flo-Coat Resurfacer, if that is the case then you are correct, use a 5 gallon bucket, heavy duty drill and a mixing blade. I wouldnt recommend mixing the Flo-Coat in a wheelbarrow.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 at 4:06 PM

will "Top 'N Bond" bond to concrete or steel painted with primer? thanks
- pat
Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 12:54 PM

Hired a company of professionals ? to replace our large quarter round patio and landing abutting it as well as front door landing. Back landing I presume is sitting on a 42" stack of cinder blocks and abuts the board under the back door with a 7 1/2" step. I cannot see if its attached to the house frame or the cinder block foundation. The front landing is larger and appears to be attached to the bottom board of the houses frame but not attached to the cement pad in front of it. Issue is that the guy planning the replacement of the back landing now insists on cutting into the board under the back door and covering the existing landing with 1" concrete. Which I say is asking for trouble because heat/cold/use/etc. will cause that type of over cement to only crack and crumble. Now he insists he must have a waiver in case he cracks the foundation. Nothing of the sort was mentioned in the contract, only its replacement. I think the best way to fix it would be too use a diamond saw to cut or drill the existing layer of cement off the cinder blocks, rough and etch it to create a fresh surface and install a proper type of cement over the blocks while maintaining its current height beneath the door. Then pouring the concrete patio from the level created (should be the same height as the current landing) and adding a step if necessary to the patio level. Your thoughts on this?? Then there's the front landing which he said he could drill away from the cement under the door frame and pop the top off of because its hollow and replace the cement. But that was last week, he may have changed his mind on that course of replacement as well by now. How should these landings be replaced properly?
- CJ
Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 3:47 PM

Pat, unfortunately the Top'n Bond is not designed to be applied over steel. If the concrete has any coatings on it (paint, primers or sealers) those must be completely removed prior to applying the Top'n Bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, August 30, 2013 at 7:32 AM

I have an existing,new concrete wall, 18" high OUTSIDE It as not pretty and I want to face it with 2" river rock..I really don't know what product(s) to use for this project.
- g.das
Friday, August 30, 2013 at 4:15 PM

CJ, it would be best to get in touch with your local building department to see what is required for your application. They would determine the proper installation methods.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, August 30, 2013 at 4:19 PM

the wall I mention above is between my yard and sidewalk; a retainer wall poured recently.It is 18" high and 6" thick with re-bar and footers.And i would like to tile it with the 2" rock If it were inside i would do it like a normal tile job..thanks, bob
- g.das
Friday, August 30, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Thanks I thought that would be the best method. So I can't do this job alone. That bucket will be too much for an old lady to move around. Thanks for the feedback.
- Teresa
Monday, September 2, 2013 at 4:28 PM

I Have a basement floor that has sunk to the outside about 4". The area is about 4' feet by 12'from 4'' to the outside to level with the other half of the floor. I would like to put enough material down to level it an place tile down. I am thinking of putting down Lightweight Concrete Mix after first applying a bonding agent to the old concrete. In an earlier post on Oct 20 you recommended using three products High Strength or the 5000 Plus, sand mix and the Top and Bond. I assume these are all laid down at the same time while the previous material is still wet. Does this sound like I am on track? This post is great!
- Bill
Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 7:55 AM

G, for your application I would use the Sakrete Stone Veneer Mortar. The stones are small so weight will not be an issue for adhering to the wall.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 6, 2013 at 11:21 AM

Bill, yes I would follow that same type of application. Another option you have is to use the Sand Mix and apply it in two lifts, allowing the first layer to harden prior to applying the second layer. The Sand Mix is used for areas 1/2" - 2" in thickness. If you can keep it a minimum of 1/2" then this may be your best option. A bonding agent like the Concrete Bonder & Fortifier would be recommended prior to applying the Sand Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 6, 2013 at 11:34 AM

I am trying to improve the water drainage along a retaining wall that comes out about 8 feet from the foundation and concrete slab(floor) of the new workshop. There is also a problem with water absorbing into the masonry retaining wall and entering the building on the lower level, where the retaining wall is exposed for a 4 foot height (this is a bi-level structure). I have dug away all of the rock, dirt and bedding along the exterior retaining wall, all the way to the footing (a flat surface). I want to add some concrete to make a sloped edge on top of the footing (toward the masonry wall). What is the best product to use for this situation, as it is underground and probably moist? How long should I wait before I put the rock and earth back? I plan to coat the masonry and this new concrete with a waterproofing also, before putting in a layer of river rock against the retaining wall. And, yes there is a drainage system of 4" perf pipe and rock along the footing. Thanks in advance for your advice! This site is great.
- Helga
Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 5:39 PM

I am getting my father in laws house ready to sell. Mainly it needs painting. However there is one area on an outside corner of the house where a surface coat has broken off of the outer part of the basement wall between the siding and the ground. I was thinking of just building it up with a couple of layers of mortar or whataver, but, the broken part is all one piece aed I got to thinking it might be easier and better to bond this piece back in place and just patch the crack. I'm thinking that way the way the surface is finished will be the same. What would you suggest. Also, would simply using a waterproof version of a Liquid Nails construction adhesive woak as well?
- Tom
Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Helga, due to the complexity of this application it would be best to contact us at 866-SAKRETE. We would like to gather a little more information on your project.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 8:16 AM

Tom, I wouldn't recommend using an adhesive to adhere that section of stucco back to the wall. My concern with doing that would be freeze/thaw damage. If moisture were to pass behind that section and then freeze it will more than likely cause the section to pop off. The recommended method to repair it would be to remove any loose material and reapply the stucco.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 8:25 AM

I sealed a large crack with an epoxy concrete patching material. will the Flo coat adhere to it? Thanks
- Roger
Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 10:36 AM

Roger, unfortunately it isn't recommended to apply the Flo-Coat over an epoxy. You will not get the proper adhesion that you would if you were applying it over concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 8:00 AM

I've got an old garage floor where several large (7 x 6 or so) sections have cracked and fallen to different degrees. I'm looking to do a rough fill-in before getting a thin top coat put over later. Some of the cracked areas have fallen more than 2 inches at their lowest and are level one the other end (previous owner didn't install gutters on that side, and a lot of dirt under the slab has washed away, which has been fixed). What's my best course of action? Can this be fixed, or do I have to pay a bunch of money for a company to hydraulically lift and repair the slab?
- Jeff
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 3:26 PM

Jeff, you may want to have a professional come take a look at the slab. When doing a topping the product will only be as good as the prep and substrate condition. My concern is the amount of settlement that has occured. If there is any movement down the road those cracks can easily transfer through the topping.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Dean...thanks much
- g das
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 5:34 PM

We had our side walk done few years back, but they made in a way that the water goes into the besement through the window. Is there a way how to bond the new concrete with the old one if I fill in to raise the edge so the water stop going to the basement. Thanks Maria
- Maria
Friday, September 20, 2013 at 10:59 PM

I want to enclose our garage and make an additional room. The concrete is about 1 1/2 inches lower than the rest of the slab. Is it possible to pour additional concrete to make up the additional 1 1/2 inches? I am under the impression that this would be too thin.
- Manetta
Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 5:43 PM

Maria, was the sidewalk built against the wall? If it slopes towards the house you may want to use a resurfacing product to build it up to slope that water away from the house.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 7:51 AM

Manetta, you can use a product like the Sand Mix to build up that section. Make sure the concrete is in good condition and clean, there shouldn't be any paints, stains or sealers present on the concrete. In order to bond well to the existing concrete I would recommend applying the Bonder & Fortifier to the concrete prior to placing the Sand Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 7:56 AM

I have a french drain in my basement with a 2" gap that I want to shrink to a 1" gap. Can I use this technique to add an inch to close the gap.Thanks
- Jon
Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 9:18 AM

Just to be clear. The 2' gap is between the the concrete that poured over the drain gravel and the the foundation wall.So I'd be adhering concrete to concrete horizontally.
- Jon
Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 12:16 PM

Jon, since this is a horizontal application the application would be the same. Make sure the existing concrete is clean and apply the Bonder & Fortifier, once the Bonder & Fortifier is tacky to the touch the Sand Mix can be applied.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 4:10 PM

I have a deteriorating foundation of a garage that I have just used your commercial grade concrete to fill and patch. I now need to use a product to fill areas less in depth and to smooth out the wall to an even appearance. I was considering a mortar mix, tried some Top & Bond I've had sitting around for over 15 years but it had zero adhesive and set qualities left (guess time took it's toll). Point is, what would be the best product to patch and smooth over the wall for a consistent appearance and to fill in the remaining rough/exposed concrete to a depth off approximately 1.5"?
- Tom
Friday, September 27, 2013 at 1:49 PM

That would be a vertical section just above ground level and a maximum depth (at very few places) of 1.5",average depth is 0.5" to 1.0"?
- Tom
Friday, September 27, 2013 at 1:54 PM

Hi Dean. On July 22 I posted a question about applying river rock to an existing concrete porch/landing. You kindly replied saying there was no Sakrete product available. Now I am confused as another poster (g.das on August 30) had the same question/situation and you advised using Sakrete stone veneer mortar. (I don't want to use an aggregate that you mentioned....I too just want to mortar in hand placed river rocks.) I'm hoping you misunderstood my first post and will now tell me stone veneer mortar is what I need. Thanks for any clarification. Kathy
- kathy
Friday, September 27, 2013 at 3:06 PM

Tom, for a vertical application we don't specifically have a product to go 1.5 inches in depth in one application but what you could use would be the Top'n Bond and apply it in multiple layers. If the old Top'n Bond you used was 15 years old that passed it's shelf life so that's why it didnt work properly.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 27, 2013 at 4:00 PM

Kathy, for the previous blog post that g.das wrote, that dealt with a wall that he wanted to adhere stone to, your application was a porch/landing. There won't be any traffic on the small wall that g.das had so setting those small stones with the Stone Veneer Mortar won't be a problem. My only concern with your application was the fact that it's a traffic bearing surface and the overall wear and tear that the porch may get, plus you don't want to use a mortar for a walkway, they are used for vertical surfaces. Many times they use epoxies for the natural stone/chattahoochee mix on walkways.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 27, 2013 at 4:16 PM

Thanks Dean, yes the sidewalk was build against the wall, and it slopes down the window. I wish I been home when they did it. Thanks again, and I will give it a try resurfacing. Maria
- Maria
Monday, September 30, 2013 at 3:21 PM

Hi, we are building a set of steps and had already poured a concrete base for the steps and after it dried, we used mortar and concrete blocks to form the steps. We realized that the steps were not centered correctly so we added 2 inches to the base and now want to pour additional concrete to the side of the blocks to add two inches to the steps. Will the poured concrete adhere to the dry concrete and concrete block?
- Mary
Monday, October 7, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Mary, getting two inches of concrete to bond to concrete block will be difficult on a vertical surface. Would you be able to go 1/2" on each side of the vertical section with the Surface Bonding Cement?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 at 2:45 PM

Hello, I am trying to raise the concrete foundation in my master bath toilet area (maybe 15sq feet) up to the same height as the rest of the master bath foundation so I can lay tile throughout. The toilet area foundation is lower than the rest of the foundation by approximately 1.5 to 2 inches. After I clean the area thoroughly, what product can I use to fill this area? Also, I'm assuming it is ok to fill in this area without a border separating the new topper.
- Adam
Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 3:22 PM

Adam, you have a couple options if you are needing to build up the concrete floor prior to tiling. You can use either the B-1 Trowel Grade Leveler or the Sand Mix, both can be used up to 2" in thickness. If you have areas that need to be feathered down you should use the B-1. The Sand Mix must maintain a 1/2" thickness when used.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, October 28, 2013 at 4:34 PM

The lip of my drive way has broke out almost full length 6-8 in wide at an average depth of 3- 3 1/2 in at highest point. Exception is 5 -6 in " on one side for about 5-8" the advantage I have is that the breakout is really rough and I plan to pilot holes for "anchors" with concrete nails. Am I going wrong withSac bond/fortifier & fast set cement patch. Or is the run too long to work its entirety with out mix drying and breaking continuity ? Is a small amount of epoxy (enough to stabilize nails a problem )? Thanks.
- Charlie
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 at 10:10 PM

Charlie, for your application due to the thickness you will need to use a concrete mix. The Fast Setting Cement Patcher is only used for repairs up to 2" in thickness. It sounds like you need to form up the area and then pour the concrete to fill the area that has broken off. Make sure all of the broken/loose material has been removed, an appropriate base of gravel is present and then you can pour the concrete. Keep the forms on for 24 hours and then once you remove them you can back fill that area. Incorporating anchors/rebar is a good idea, keep in mind also that down the road there will more than likely be a small hairline crack where the two concretes meet.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 2:40 PM

Help! I am an artist and for a sculptural piece I needed a 16" x 36" x 1 1/2" base. I constructed a form for it out of melamine. The place where I purchased said one bag of Sakrete concrete mix was the right amount to buy. And though I followed the directions precisely, there is about a 1/4 to 3/8 in. gap short. I poured this yesterday and now don't know if I can add anything to bring the material up level with the top of the form. Adding to my dilemma is the fact that the temp. is dropping - we are down to 2C today. Is there any way that I can salvage this project? Thanks very much
- Diane
Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 9:52 AM

Forgot to say, the base I am pouring is in the garage up off the floor. And I have added fibers to the mix. It seems to have set up ok over-night. Thanks again
- Diane
Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 10:02 AM

I have a concrete floor that is out of level. I'd like to use a sand mix, but the thickness needed varies from 3.5 inches to 0.5 inches. Any ideas?
- Tom
Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 8:30 PM

Diane, to bring up the level on that concrete you should use the Sakrete Top'n Bond. It would be recommended to allow that pour to cure for 28 days prior to resurfacing it since it is fresh concrete. Also, keep in mind that it needs to be at least 50F for the first 24 hours when using the Top'n Bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 4:09 PM

Tom, for that thickness what I would recommend would be to use the Sakrete Sand Mix and do two layers. Make sure the existing concrete has been prepared and that there are no paints, stains or sealers. When the first layer is still fresh put scratches in it, that way the second layer will have a good surface to bond to. The second layer can be applied once the first layer has set and can not be disturbed by a trowel. Also, I would apply the Bonder & Fortifier on the original concrete slab to make sure the Sand Mix bonds well.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 4:12 PM

Thanks Dean for your reply. Unfortunately, I am going to have just two weeks before I will need to have this concrete slab finished. Do you think I am out of luck with this? Hope not.
- Diane
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 5:26 PM

Thanks Dean! That's just the information I needed.
- Tom
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Diane, I would still recommend to let it fully cure prior to resurfacing it. Keep in mind if you can keep that area warm for the first day that is an option to resurface it after it cures.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 9:41 AM

Hi, I have a set of concrete stairs that are not up to code. I plan on fixing this by adding a layer of concrete to each of the steps ranging in thickness from 7/8" up to 2-5/8". I do plan on bushing down the surface and forming each step. Could you please point me in the right direction to what products of yours would work the best for me to get the best job possible. Thank you
- Robert
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 1:48 PM

Robert, do you plan on resurfacing the entire stairs? Risers and treads? Or will you just be resurfacing the treads?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 3:58 PM

Dean, My plan was just to resurface the tread only.
- Robert
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Robert, for that thickness you are right between the range of two different products being used. You can use the Sand Mix and for any areas where you have to go more than 2" in depth, do two layers. If there is any loose material make sure it is removed and also that the surface is clean prior to resurfacing.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Dean, I am in the process of installing a new paint booth and the floors in my shop are unlevel. There is a low spot where a old floor drain sits and it is approx 3" low in area 8 X 12. One of the walls will be sitting about 1 foot from the lowest spot. What would be the best way to fill this in?
- Steve
Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 9:10 PM

Steve, what are you planning on having as the final floor surface? Will it remain exposed concrete? Does it range from a featheredge to 3" in depth?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, November 8, 2013 at 11:18 AM

Final surface will prob. be a epoxy floor coating of some sort. I want to eliminate the floor drain completely and fill the 3" hole in and bring it to level with a feather edge. I can take a photo and send it to you if that helps
- Steve
Friday, November 8, 2013 at 12:33 PM

If you could give me a call that would be great, that way we can discuss it more and also maybe send the picture. You can reach me at 866-SAKRETE.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, November 8, 2013 at 1:29 PM

We have just had a new concrete driveway and are in the process of having a concrete walkway and steps put in. The steps were uneven and had to be taken out. The contractor took out most of the concrete at the bottom of the steps but left most of the concrete at the top where the steps meet the walkway. He has told us he is going to just pour new concrete over the existing concrete and that it will be fine because it is "new" concrete. It's been about a week ago. The walkway itself (that he is connecting with) was done about 2 weeks ago. Is this something we should be concerned about? Janet
- Janet
Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 8:39 AM

Sorry, I should have also mentioned that the walkway is stamped, the new part connecting with it and the steps are also projected to be stamped. Does this make a difference?
- Janet
Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 9:03 AM

Janet, typically when applying new cementitious materials over existing concrete you want to wait 28 days for the concrete to cure prior to applying the product. There are some products where you can apply them quicker however it just all depends on the make up of the product. My concern with your application though is the stamped concrete, stamped concrete usually is sealed so getting concrete to bond to it may be difficult.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 11:41 AM

Dean, Thank you for your help.
- Robert
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 3:45 PM

I have a concrete slap about 26x50 that was out in the weather for 20 plus years. I have built over it and would like to know if there is any way to fill the cracks and stop the dust when sweeping. I would think another layer would need to be poured over the top. Is this possible?
- Peter Schmidt
Wednesday, November 13, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Peter, this would be a good application for the Flo-Coat however you would have to correct that dusting issue, any resurfacing product will not bond well to dusting concrete. You will need to get down to solid concrete, this can typically be done by pressure washing the concrete however since this area is now indoors a pressure washer more than likely isnt going to work, you can mechanically roughen up the affected concrete to get to a solid substrate prior to resurfacing.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 4:03 PM

I have a project similar to one listed here (Fred - 04/05/11 - porch edge degradation), only mine is a window opening, interior side. I need to accomplish the same outcome so I can install channel-set glass block in the opening. These surfaces will also be receiving thin-set mortar as a porcelain tile base (this is in a shower enclosure). I need to build it up approximately 1-1/8 inches to level as a base for the glass block. Suggestions?
- Terry
Friday, November 22, 2013 at 11:45 PM

Terry, for your application as long as it's over concrete I would use the Sakrete Sand Mix. Do a slurry coat with the Sand Mix over the existing concrete and then place the Sand Mix over the fresh slurry, this will ensure a good bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, November 25, 2013 at 2:49 PM

Hi - I would like to make a dam/lip/vertical protrusion on an existing concrete greenhouse floor, so that water dripping from the plants on the greenhouse tables will stay on one side of this dam thing. The dam thing will be about 15 ft long and 2-3" high, with one straight vertical face and one sloping face, so it has a Half Dome-like cross section. Which of your products should I use for this? Also, I'm not sure if the existing floor is sealed or not - how do I determine this? (or would it be obvious?) Also, the maintenance guy I work with is concerned that this will crack away from the existing floor. Is there a way of ensuring that this will not happen?
- PG
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at 5:53 PM

PG, for this application there are a couple products that I would recommend. Starting with the Sakrete Sand Mix, you can apply that from 2" to a 1/2" thick. If you want to feather out the last 1/2" section, essentially building a ramp, you can use the Top'n Bond once the Sand Mix has hardened (next day should be enough time). With any application prep is very important so if possible it would be great to pressure wash the area that you are resurfacing. Also, do a slurry coat with the Sand Mix to ensure a good bond. As far as whether there is a sealer present, you can do a quick water drop test and if the water pools on top more than likely a sealer is present, if it absorbs into the concrete then most likely it isn't sealed.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, December 20, 2013 at 7:54 AM

I need to install curbing (dam) around my sump pump area to stop water flow outside the area when we have power outages (have floor drain in same area but have to direct it there) What would be the best material to use? Looking at 2" X 2" walls. What is the best sealer to use to waterproof this curb and is caulking required?
- Larry
Tuesday, December 24, 2013 at 9:24 AM

Larry, the product to use for this application would be the Sand Mix. You can use it to build the 2" x 2" barrier. Make sure the concrete does not have any sealers, coatings or paint and use either the Bonder & Fortifier or do a slurry coat to ensure a good bond. As far as the coating goes, you may want to look into a waterproof coating that is applied similar to a paint. Whether or not you caulk it would depend on the coating used.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, December 26, 2013 at 12:01 PM

My husband and I have taken up a slate tile floor in our entryway 4' x 5' that had a concrete board over concrete beneath it. The concrete board chipped when we break off the tiles and the concrete thin set is still in some places which has left a very uneven surface. Can you make some recomendations for us. The thickness of the area varies from 1.25" to 2"depth. Could we apply a Bonder & Fortifier to the uneven surface then apply a Sand Mix then skim coat to make the outside look uniform?
- Martha and Tom
Tuesday, December 31, 2013 at 12:21 PM

Martha & Tom, if there is left over thin set and cement board on the existing concrete it would be recommended to remove those and get down to clean concrete to resurface it. The less factors you have when resurfacing the better, I would be afraid those could affect the bond and overall life of the repair. Once those are removed you can then apply the Bonder & Fortifier and Sand Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, December 31, 2013 at 3:48 PM

I have a perfectly level garage floor that allows water to run in different directions from melting snow and ice from my vehicles. The builder did not slope the garage floor. I want to put something on the existing floor to create a slope toward the double doors at the rear. A friend mentioned cement glue and troweling in a fine mixture of SAKRETE material. will this work and do you have helpful hints?
- Monty
Sunday, February 2, 2014 at 11:57 PM

Monty, it will depend on how thick you will have to apply the resurfacing material. It sounds like the Top'n Bond could be used or even the Sand Mix. First off, does the concrete have a sealer on it? As long as it does not have a sealer then one of those product could be applied. The Top'n Bond is used for applications of 1/2" down to a featheredge, you dont need a bonding agent with the Top'n Bond because it is already polymer modified. If you were to use the Sand Mix, which is used for 1/2" to 2" applications you would need to use a bonding agent since it is not polymer modified. Make sure the concrete is very clean prior to applying any type of product over it.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, February 3, 2014 at 5:03 PM

I have two slabs in my shop. One sits about 2" higher than the other. I would like to make a small ramp that would make rolling equipment easier. What would be the best product to use? The ramp would be in an area where a wall used to be so there are no oil or paint issues just a small amount of mortar here and there.Thanks
- Nick
Friday, February 7, 2014 at 6:29 PM

Nick, for your application the Fast Setting Cement Patcher would be the product to use. It is used for repairs 1/4" to 2" in thickness, prior to applying it a slurry coat is recommended to achieve a good bond.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, February 10, 2014 at 12:30 PM

I have a garage slab that is about 1" or so over the grade. I am going to put a new garage up and want to raise the thickness of the slab about 2". Can I clean it off put concrete bonder on it and put 2x4 around the whole slab. Then use concrete sand mix to go over the garage floor to build it up 2"? garage slab is 16'x23'
- Marty Connolly
Friday, February 21, 2014 at 7:37 PM

Will concrete sealant affect Top n Bond performance on a walkway?
- Alex
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 9:59 AM

Marty, as long as there are no paints or sealers on the existing garage slab and it is properly prepared as stated on our datasheet. Then the answer would be yes, you can use the Sakrete Bonder and Foritfier and then use the Sakrete Sand Mix which can be applied at 1/2' to 2' in thickness. Also be sure to honor any expansion joints that are in the existing slab.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 10:41 AM

Alex, yes a concrete sealant would affect the adhesion of the Top-N-Bond on a walkway or any other substrate where a paint or sealer is present.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 10:44 AM

Thanks. Let me rephrase the question... Will putting sealant on top of Top-N-Bond negatively affect it's performance?
- Alex
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 1:16 PM

Alex, sorry I misunderstood your first question. You always want to follow the sealer manufacturer’s recommendations when it comes to the application of the sealer. Some will tell you that you have to wait 7 days and some say that you have to wait 28 days for a full cure. Time frames for sealing can vary, but it could affect the performance if it is sealed too soon.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Mark, if this is a planter and it has pushed the blocks outward due to improper drainage then you would first have to remove the dirt, if you haven’t already. Depending on how many blocks are affected and the condition that they are in, you may have to replace some of them. Hopefully you will not have to replace all of them. Drill your holes for the rebar in every other cell and epoxy your rebar in place. Reset your new blocks in fresh mortar. If this is not the type of application that you are referring too then I may need a little more information to go on.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 3:32 PM

I have a 18 inch high - narrow - 8 inch wide concrete wall holding in the flat garden area in front of my brownstone. It is split almost at the mid-height and pushed forward 2 inches over a 8 foot section. Should I drill and set some rebar and then bond with adhesive (both the rebar and along the entire split). I have dealt with the drainage issue that caused the problem
- Mark - Boston
Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 3:48 PM

it is a poured concrete wall -- no blocks used. Think of it as solid pieces of concrete that I'm trying to realign and firmly reconnect. I will absolutely dig the dirt back, but gravel and better drainage in the bed.
- Mark - Boston
Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 3:54 PM

I am building a shed and am using 30" galvanized pipe instead of sonatube for my footers. I must have mixed my concrete too wet because as it dryed it settled down in the pipe about 3/4" below the lip of the pipe. I have anchor bolts coming up through the concrete that are tied to rebar baskets inside the footers. I am wanting to add enough product to the top of the settled concrete to get the top surface level with the lip of the pipe so the steel leg of the shed will be at the correct height. What product do you recommend that i use for this project?
- Kelly Goodrich
Friday, February 28, 2014 at 8:36 PM

Kelly, The Sakrete Fast Setting Cement Patcher can be applied from 1/2" to 2" in thickness in one application. Make sure that the surface is cleaned and free of any dust or debris before applying the material.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 3:17 PM

Mark, Then you are correct. You would have to adjust your wall back into position. Then drill and epoxy in the rebar for support. But you are going to have to get down into the footing when you drill it. Once your wall is repaired in in place you could coat the wall with Sakrete Surface Bonding Cement on both sides before you place your dirt back in the planter. This will conceal the crack, reinforce the area around the crack and give you a uniform look.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 3:46 PM

Hi, great article by the way. I have an old house and the basement slab has many dips and slants. A contractor said he would level the entire basement floor by pouring new cement with a 'bonding layer'. In some places the new surface may be 3/4 inches thick in others 2 full inches. Is that possible using cement or does it require some other material?
- Zeb
Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 5:13 PM

Zeb, Yes, it is possible if the contractor is using a self leveling material. Make sure that a moisture test is done prior to installation. If your moisture levels are too high then the new floor could fail. However, if your install a moisture mitigation system in prior to the leveler then this could eliminate that issue.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Thanks! I will proceed with the cement patcher product.
- Kelly G
Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 12:25 PM

We have a carport concrete slab that was never reinforced and now has several 3 foot long cracks. We have placed a concrete footing wall around the edge (all to code with re-bar and deep footings) and are turning the space into a garage. We would like to repair the cracks on the existing slab and then pour a properly reinforced 3 inch thick floor. Can you recommend some specific products for this plan. Thank-you
- Kathy
Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at 6:29 PM

Kathy - thank you for your question about this type of installation. For the crack repairs that have to make you can use a number of different products depending on the width and the depth of the cracks in your carport. For any cracks that are from a featheredge (meaning tapered to a thin edge) to ½” you can use the Sakrete Top N’ Bond and for cracks that are larger than ½” to 2” you can use either the Sakrete Fast Setting Cement Patcher or the Sakrete Sand Mix. As for the 3” pour you can use any of the products that are listed as a concrete mix, such as: Sakrete 5000 Plus High Strength, Fast Setting, High Strength, or the Maximizer. Please keep in mind when bonding new concrete to old concrete it is advisable to use the Sakrete Concrete Bonder & Fortifier as the primer.
- CAE - Tech Service Team
Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 11:40 AM

The toilet flange in my bathroom is loose. It is supposed to be bolted to the concrete slab but the hole in the slab is deteriorated or maybe was always too big so I will need to build up the concrete, fill in around the waste pipe so I will have something to screw the flange to (Tapcon screws). I think your "Non-shrink Construction Grout" might be my best choice for this repair. How well will this bond to the old concrete? Should I use a liquid bonding agent with this product? What can I use to clean the old concrete? It is full of old wax from toilet wax rings. Thanks in advance, John
- John R
Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 10:16 PM

I want to build a small concrete "speed hump" on my concrete driveway to divert some running water away from an area of landscaping that is being flooded/saturated from rain. Would the "scratch coat" method mentioned here with a simple layer of repair material suffice to "bond" this new "hump" to the existing concrete driveway? Many thanks.
- David
Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 11:31 AM

I want to install ceramic tiles on the basement floor of about 1,000 sq. ft. However, the floor is uneven with difference between the highest and lowest point of 4 inches. One contractor advised to use self-leveling cement only with a price tag around $7,000 just to level off the floor, insisting that other applications or combinations of applications will not work. Please advise if there are any other fewer expensive options with a good result. Thanks in advance. Alan
- Alan R
Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 6:23 PM

I have an existing concrete retaining wall approx. 30 inches wide, 2 feet high and 20 feet long located at the edge of a lake. I want to add a 3 foot high rock retaining wall on top of the existing concrete wall. What should I do to bond concrete from rock wall to existing concrete base? I need an answer today, as I am leaving for the lake tomorrow. Thank you
- Allen
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 3:20 AM

John, You will need to scrape the wax off the surface of the concrete with a putty knife. Once the concrete is clean you can drill out your holes where the anchor bolts go and then use the Sakrete Anchor Cement to reset your bolts for the toilet flange.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:15 AM

David, The scratch coat method would be fine. Make sure that the concrete is clean and that there are no paints or sealers present.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Alan, Unfortunately the contractor is right. To be able to lay tile and have a nice looking floor, it needs to be flat. A self-leveling material is the better way to go in this particular application. Most of the products in the Sakrete line that would be able to handle 4" would all be trowel grade materials. Troweling a floor and getting it level would be really hard and end up costing you more money in the long run.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 10:40 AM

Allen, I can only assume that given the thickness of your wall, it was built to hold back the rising water levels of the lake. If that is the case then it would be continuously saturated with water. That saturation would be a bond breaker for a mortar that would be needed to set your stones because it would not allow the material to cure properly. If the wall is not in direct contact with the lake water then you would want to use Sakrete Type S mortar mix.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 1:53 PM

I think you misunderstood my question. There is nothing to drill out at the locations where the toilet flange needs to be bolted down. I will need to build the area up with a mortar or concrete product. if there was any concrete there to be drilled then I would have simply screwed in a tapcon and been done already.
- John R
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 10:07 PM

Thank you for comment on leveling off the basement floor. Still, have a question. Would work such scenario when 2.5" will level off with good quality concrete, and remaining 1.5" will be level off with self-leveling material? If such solution will result in a good quality floor, it would save a substantial sums of money. Please advise.
- Alan
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 7:53 AM

John, I apologize for any misunderstandings. In an effort to capture the correct information about your project please give us a call at 866-Sakrete so that the team can assist you appropriately.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 10:43 AM

Alan, Yes you could use other cement materials to fill in the deeper areas to cut down the amount self-leveling material. However, you will need to keep a couple of things in mind. It will be more labor intensive and you will have to wait 28 days for the material to fully cure before a self-leveler can be installed over it. First clean the area and remove any dust, debris, paints, or sealers. You will then prime the areas that are to be filled in with Sakrete Bonder & Fortifier. Our Sakrete Sand Topping Mix can be applied from ½” – 2” in thickness. This could cut down half of the Self-leveler that will be used to even out your floor. I am not sure if this will save you much money in the long run due to the labor involved and I also do not know if you are under any time constraints.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Thursday, March 27, 2014 at 9:09 AM

I have a rough concrete slab with imbedded radiant tubing in a new kitchen which I would like to cover with a thin coat of smooth concrete and then acid-stain. Could I use the bonder/fortifier with a 3/4" to 1" coat of sand mix for this? Thanks for any advice.
- pat
Thursday, March 27, 2014 at 9:24 PM

Pat, Yes you can. You will have to make sure that the floor heating system is shut off and you cannot turn the system back on for 30 days. This will allow the material to properly cure in its own time. If you leave the heating system on or turn it on before 30 days the heat will dry the material out to fast and you will get cracking and delamination from the substrate.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Friday, March 28, 2014 at 4:13 PM

I have a 60 year old back door patio, 13' x 15', sided with garage and house on 2 sides, low cinder-block wall around the rest. It was graded to the middle, meandering to a 2" opening in the wall for drainage. This results in a mosquito pond all summer and a skating rink most of the winter. I would like roof and screen the space and level it. I would estimate the maximum depth of new concrete to be 2" or so. Which product would you recommend for solid adhesion and a smooth finish? Thank you!
- Rob
Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 4:56 PM

I have a driveway with the first 2 feel actually sloped back to the garage. Which product should I use to fill from that area back to a 2" strip of aluminum I will put in front of the overhead door? Should I add some bolts and mesh to hold the resulting ramp? Thank you!
- Rob
Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 4:59 PM

i have a slab in my backyard that is a half court basketball court. It's in good condition and mostly needs a repainting. However, there's a depression in about 1/4 of the slab that collects water. It makes the surface slimy and dangerously slippery and gives a home to breeding mosquito's in the summer. Is it possible to repair the depression?
- gary
Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 9:54 AM

Our stair are concrete with tile surfacing. The gtiles are broke and chipped. We are remocing the tiles and want to keep thew stair all concrete. With that being said we will need to grind the surface to get it even and get rid off glue and stuff. Maybe looking at taking off about 1 inch. Need to poor cement and want to make sure at bonds to the existing cement, how do I do that. Looking for best practice.
- Margaret
Monday, April 14, 2014 at 1:36 PM

I have a concrete ramp that is 4'x40' The ramp has many chipped out places some as deep as 3/4" from salt can this be resurfaced
- Roger
Monday, April 14, 2014 at 8:58 PM

Gary, Yes, to repair the depression I would recommend preparing the surface first and then using our Flo Coat product which can be applied up to ½” to level out the surface that is collecting water. Make sure to remove all paint, stain, and debris before applying. Also refer to the technical data sheet on our website for preparation specifics.
- Chris Technical Services
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 6:35 AM

Rob, you want to first start off by cleaning the area and remove all unsound concrete, grease, oil, paint and any other foreign materials that will inhibit performance. Slick or sealed surfaces must be thoroughly roughened to CSP 3-5. After cleaning prime the surface with Sakrete Bonder Fortifier and allow it to dry, this will take approx. 1-2 hours. I would recommend using our Sakrete Sand Mix to fill in “the mosquito pond”. It can be applied in layers ranging from ½” to 2”. After the sand mix has been applied and cured you can use our Flo Coat product to level the area and achieve the smooth finish you are looking for. Any other questions please call us at 1-866-SAKRETE
- Chris Technical Services
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 6:38 AM

Margaret, I would suggest to use our Fast Setting Cement Patcher. You can apply this in thicknesses from ½” to 2”. The material can be molded during its initial setting phase, just make sure you do not over work the product. As far as removing the old material you can visit your local hardware store to rent a machine to remove excess debris from the stairs. You want to first start off by cleaning the area and remove all unsound concrete, grease, oil, paint and any other foreign materials that will inhibit performance. After cleaning prime the surface with Sakrete Bonder Fortifier and allow it to dry, this will take approx. 1-2 hours. We would also recommend that you use 50/50 water and Bonder Fortifier in your mix. This allows you more working time and adhesion. Then use the Fast Setting Cement Patcher and refer to our data sheet located on the SAKRETE website for install instructions. If you have any other questions please do not hesitate to call us at 1-866-SAKRETE.
- Chris Technical Services
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 7:31 AM

Roger, Yes I would suggest patching with our Top N Bond product and resurfacing with Flo Coat. Make sure that the surface is clean and free of paint, sealers, and debris. Allow the Top N Bond to cure within a 24 hour period before using the Flo Coat. If you have any other questions do not hesitate to call us at 1-866-SAKRETE.
- Chris Technical Services
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 7:41 AM

We are building a type "D" curbing, my extruder machine do just the 6" above ground, i don't want to fill 12" underground with the machine and then 6". I filled the underground and now the inspector said that I have to make all 18" curb high monolithic. Could you please help me with some concrete bonding agent or maybe dowels to attach new concrete to old concrete (1 day old). We are using ready mix 4000 PSI. Thanks
- Roberto Lozano
Friday, April 18, 2014 at 4:28 PM

We are building a type "D" curbing, my extruder machine do just the 6" above ground, i don't want to fill 12" underground with the machine and then 6". I filled the underground and now the inspector said that I have to make all 18" curb high monolithic. Could you please help me with some concrete bonding agent or maybe dowels to attach new concrete to old concrete (1 day old). We are using ready mix 4000 PSI. Thanks
- Roberto Lozano
Friday, April 18, 2014 at 4:39 PM

For my Boy Scout Eagle Project I am rebuilding a water well cover at a historical building in my town so that it will be a replica of what was originally there, 200 years ago. Perhaps 80 + years ago someone poured a cement pad to surround the opening. The pad is about 3 inches thick and 36 inches square. For the most part the pad is in good shape, except on one side where the cement is missing and in in some points down to the ground. There are a few cracks. I don't want to add to the thickness to the pad because the pad is connected to a sidewalk so I don't want to create a height difference because that would be a tripping hazard. But I was thinking a skim coat over the entire surface would be good so that the pad's surface has a uniform look. I would also need to tint the cement so it doesn't look new. What product should I use? How do I tint the cement? Thanks!
- Milan
Saturday, April 19, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Roberto, based on the information given I would recommend that you take the inspectors recommendation and make it all 18” monolithic.
- Chris Technical Services
Monday, April 21, 2014 at 7:44 AM

Milan, how much material is missing? There are 2 products I would recommend. First if your repair is more than a ½” thick I would use our Bonder Fortifier and Fast Setting Cement Patcher. The Fast Setting Cement Patcher can be applied in 2” layers. The Bonder Fortifier should be used as an additive of 1:3 for the Fast Setting Cement Patcher as stated in the technical data sheet. For layers up to a ½” thick use our Top N’ Bond. For either product it is crucial to make sure the area is clean and free of debris before applying, your final outcome depends on how well you prepped the area. You can refer to our technical data sheets for proper preparation. You can also use Top N’ Bond for the skim coat since it’s a trowel grade material without the worry of creating a tripping hazard. Since it’s hard to match existing concrete I recommend that you try the Sakrete Cement Colors as the color additive. There are five colors however getting the right color match can be very difficult. We would recommend that you try a sample first and match it beside the original. Make sure you check out our site and watch some videos; they are really helpful when using new products.
- Chris Technical Services
Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:35 AM

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