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How Much Concrete Do I Need?

posted by Bob Monday, August 15, 2011 at 9:16 AM

The number one question that we get on our hotline (1-866-Sakrete) is, “how much concrete do I need”? But let’s face it, unless you have a practical real world application for those boring math problems, you just don’t care enough to retain it. Well, now you do have a real world application so let’s go through the exercise so you will know how to do it without calling the next time. You can even impress your friends at dinner parties (if the subject about concrete should happen to come up). I would only recommend this topic for those ”friends” where you don’t mind if you were never invited back to again.

For those who are more direct, and want the short cut answer please scroll to links at the end of this blog.

The first thing you need to do is relax. It really ain’t that hard. Don’t let terms like “cubic feet” and “yield” and “density” bother you. There are basically two steps. The first step is figuring the volume of the space you want to fill. It doesn’t make any difference if you want to fill it with concrete or vanilla ice cream. Volume is volume. Because of the amount of concrete needed for most jobs it is usually easiest to figure the volume in cubic feet. If your project is large enough to calculate the volume in cubic yards instead of feet, call a ready mix concrete truck. When you hear “cubic” think ice cube. An ice cube usually has three sides (at least the ones you make in the trays in your freezer at home do). The way to find the volume of a cube is to multiple all three sides. If your cube were a perfect cube and it was 2 feet wide and 2 feet long and 2 feet deep, the volume would be 8 cubic feet. Concrete slabs are usually not perfect cubes so the math is a little different. If you were going to pour a slab that was 2 feet wide and 2 feet long it would not likely be 2 feet deep. It might be 4” deep which is a normal depth for a concrete slab. So now the equation looks like this: 2’ x 2’x 4”. The problem is you have to get everything into the same units; you can’t multiple feet by inches. This is where folks get hung up but it’s actually quite easy. Just multiple 2 x 2 x 4 ÷ 12. The answer is 1.3 cubic feet.

If you are filling a round hole in the ground to set a post or mail box, the calculation for volume is different than a cube or rectangle. The formula for the volume of a round hole is pi r2 x depth. Or 3.14 x radius x radius x depth. The radius is half the width of the hole. Unless you are doing a monster hole it might be easiest to do this all in inches. If your hole is 36” deep and 10” wide, the calculation is 3.14 x 5 x 5 x 36 ÷ 1728. This gives you 1.6 cubic feet. If you forget the 1728 it is simply 12” x 12” x 12” or the number of cubic inches in a cubic foot.

So now that we know the volume the second step is to calculate how many bags of concrete it will take to fill the hole. On the bag it will tell you how many cubic feet the bag will fill. This is the “yield”. The yield on an 80 lb bag is about 6/10 (.6) cubic feet. If you take the example above of 1.6 cubic feet, the calculation would be :

1.6 ÷ .6. = 2.7 bags


If you happen to be enthralled with math calculations I provide the following information on how to calculate the yield that I said was .6 cubic feet for an 80 lb bag. The first thing you need to know is the “density” of the concrete. If I give you a box filled with concrete that measures 12” x 12” x 12” (or 1 cubic foot), how much do you think it will weight? Go ahead and take a guess- almost everyone gets it wrong. The answer is 145 lbs. (If it was filled with beer it would weigh 64 lbs.) This means the “density” of concrete is about 145 lbs per cubic foot. Now that we have that information we can calculate the yield. Add up both the dry material in the bag (80 lbs) and the water it takes to mix it up (1 gallon which weighs 8.3 lbs) for a total weight of 88.3 lbs. Then divide the total weight by the density of the concrete.

88 ÷ 145 = .60 cubic feet.

There is one method for calculating the number of bags required which is even easier. We have already done the math for you on concrete as well as a number of other products. Visit www.Sakrete.com and select the calculator button or follow this link http://www.sakrete.com/products/calculators.cfm. Or for those interested in doing calculations on a mobile device please go to http://www.sakrete.com/mobile/calculators.cfm where our mobile site can help you determine how much you need wherever you are from the store aisle to the jobsite.

Bob Schmidt
Product Manager
Sakrete of North America

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USER COMMENTS

Can anyone tell me what percent of porcelain cement do you need to add in order to achieve 3,000 psi in order to have a good cement content?
- Roxane
Friday, September 16, 2011 at 4:18 PM

For a general purpose concrete mix you can mix 1 part portland cement, 2 parts concrete sand, and 3 parts gravel. When using our Sakrete Portland Cement you will add 6 gallons of clean water to the 94lb bag along with the appropriate amount of sand and gravel which will yield 4.5 cubic feet of material.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 16, 2011 at 5:14 PM

I live in Chicago, IL. I hired someone to rebuild my cement porch. Can you tell me how much time I have if want to finish project for this year? It's earlier November now.
- Donna
Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 7:48 PM

Donna, the amount of time you have left to finish this project can depend on many things. It is best to pour concrete when you have moderate temperatures (50-90 degrees F). If the cold weather is a concern there are a few things you can do to help out. People often use hot water to accelerate the set time on the concrete as well as keep the dry material in a warm area until you use it. For more information on cold weather applications check out the "placing concrete in hot or cold weather" section in the general blog.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 at 2:49 PM

This Website Helped Me With A Math Project Thanks for the info , Im Glad My Teacher Recommended This Website for infORMATION. Thanks Sakrete.com !
- Jonae
Sunday, November 6, 2011 at 10:09 PM

How much cementitious material is in an 80-lb bag of Sakrete High Strength Concrete?
- Julie
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 2:23 PM

Julie, the range of cementitious material can be found on the MSDS for the High Strength Concrete Mix which is 10-30%.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, November 14, 2011 at 9:21 AM

I'm so glad I found my solution olnine.
- Ruvell
Monday, November 21, 2011 at 1:26 AM

you know what. my math was wrong too. 4" is .33 not .25. and you should divide by the .6 not multiply. But instead of listening to me or this blog just use the handy calculator linked up top at the button "calculators-how much do I need"
- mathman
Saturday, September 22, 2012 at 3:20 PM

how many bags of sakrete does it take for a hole that is 24 in. round and 5 1/2 ft deep with a 4 in post in hole. i have 25 of these holes
- mike
Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 2:06 PM

Mike, if you are setting a 4" square post into a hole with a diameter of 24" and 5 1/2 ft deep, you will need 28 80lb bags or 44 50lb bags for each hole. For all 25 holes the total amount of concrete you will need is 700 80lb bags or 1100 50lb bags. We also have a calculator tool at the top right corner of the page that can help determine the amount of material needed.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 3:40 PM

how much cement would I need for a 14 foot quarter round slab?
- Tamara
Sunday, January 6, 2013 at 2:51 PM

14 foot quarter round and 4 inches deep.
- Tamara
Sunday, January 6, 2013 at 2:56 PM

Tamara, if you have a slab that is a quarter of a slab with a diameter of 14 feet, going 4 inches deep you will need 22 80lb bags or 29 60lb bags of Sakrete Concrete Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 9:03 AM

I am trying to pour a small pad that is 12 sq ft,4" deep.How many 60 lb bags of ready mix sakrete will I need.
- John Salisbury
Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 3:30 PM

John, for a 12 square foot slab, 4" deep you will need 9 60lb bags of Sakrete Concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 4:36 PM

I have a foundation i need to put in.. it's 28 feet long and 6 foot high.. how many blocks will i need.. yes i still have to lay a footer i know below this.. i have to figure how much i need there also which will be prob 10 inch thick.. im trying to put my self in a bid of what its going to run me price range in just materials
- tim
Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at 4:08 AM

Tim, I can help you out with the amount of concrete you will need for the footer. If you are laying a footer for the block foundation that is 28 feet long, 10 inches deep and let's say 1 foot wide then you will need 39 80lb bags. If you are using 60lb bags you will need 52 bags. You should contact the manufacturer of the blocks to see how many blocks you will need for that foundation.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at 4:55 PM

ok so ive tryed to calculat using ur methods can quite get it i have to lay a small footing its 12" x 3" x 64ft how many 80lb bags do i need.
- josh
Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 5:01 PM

Hi Josh, for an area that is 12in. x 3in.x 64 ft you will need 27 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 8:29 AM

How many bag of 80 pound bags of cement will I need to a space 4" thick by 15'x18'
- Randy Carpenter
Saturday, April 27, 2013 at 7:28 AM

Randy, for a slab that is 15' x 18' x 4" you will need 150 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 10:50 AM

I am doing a footer that is 12 inches deep, 18n inches wide and 40 feet long. how many 80 pound bags of concrete will it take to fill this?
- jarad
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 9:09 PM

Jarad, for a footer 12" deep, 18" wide and 40' long you will need 100 80lb bags of regular Sakrete Concrete. If you decide on using the Sakrete Maximizer for the footer that will only need 60 80lb bags due to the high yield of the Maximizer.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 9:02 AM

I intend to pour walls for a storm cellar I am going to build.i am digging app. 5 feet into the ground and one foot of the cellar will b exposed.my cellar will be 4ftx6ft.and 6 feet tall.how thick of concretewould you recommend going with the walls?i intend for my slab to be four inches thick.
- Adam
Friday, May 24, 2013 at 4:13 PM

Adam, there are many factors that determine how thick the walls must be for different structures. For this type of application it would be recommended to contact a structural engineer, they would be able to assist you with the proper width the wall must be.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 5:01 PM

I am going to pour a footer for a headstone that is 1' 2'' wide 4' 2'' length and 2' deep (not counting the 2x4 form). I have heard you put gravel in the bottom of the hole before pouring the concrete. If so how much? and how many bags of quikrete 80lb will that take? I am doing it for my fathers headstone which is pretty big and they told me the hold had to be at least 24inches deep. I want to make sure I have enough before I start this project. thanks for the help!
- Brian
Saturday, June 1, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Brian, typically you will place 2-3" of gravel as a drainage base then place the concrete. For an area 1'2" in width, 4'2" in length and 2' in depth you will need either 17 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete or 23 60lb bags of Sakrete Concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, June 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

im building a breeze block shed that will measure 6 foot by 9 foot and 6 foot tall can you tell me how much concrete i will need for the foundation and how deep and wide it has to be? also do i have to put any gravel in first as drainage or not? thanks from james
- james
Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 6:16 PM

James, I would recommend to get in touch with your local building code to get their requirement as far as the foundation size. They will be able to instruct you on the required size.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 2:01 PM

I am building a new entryway for the local animal shelter for my eagle scout project and I need a footer to put some rebar in to support the concrete blocks. It measures 55" long x 24" deep. How many 60lb bags of concrete do I need?
- Matt
Saturday, June 8, 2013 at 3:17 PM

Matt, we also need the width of the footer as well to determine the amount of Sakrete you will need but I have listed a few options below: 55" long x 24" deep x 12" wide = 21 60lb bags 55" long x 24" deep x 18" wide = 31 60lb bags 55" long x 24" deep x 24" wide = 41 60lb bags
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, June 10, 2013 at 12:19 PM

Building a 3'X 6' 4" deep pad for my home heating tank. How many bags will I need? Should I also add wire or rebar? Thanks
- randy
Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at 12:40 PM

That is 3'W 6'L 4" deep
- randy
Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at 12:43 PM

Randy, to build a 3' x 6' x 4" pad you will need either 10 80lb bags or 14 60lb bags. It is recommended to add reinforcement in the form of concrete wire or rebar.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at 1:44 PM

I am making a sports court 50' x 28' x 4" deep. How many bags do I need please? Am I better off just ordering a truck?
- Bailey
Monday, June 17, 2013 at 4:18 PM

Bailey, for that size of an application you will need 778 80lb bags. We also have a calculator which can be found here. http://www.sakrete.com/media-center/blog-detail.cfm/bp_alias/How-Much-Concrete-Do-I-Need
- Dean
Monday, June 17, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Put in a 25 ft flag pole. Hole is 2 ft deep and 18" in diameter. How much concrete will I need?
- Pasky
Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 12:13 AM

Pasky, if you are applying a 25 foot flag pole it would be recommended for the depth to be 1/2 the length that is above ground so only going 2 feet deep would not be recommended. Is the 25 feet going to be the above ground height?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 4:09 PM

Dean...its a telescoping 21ft stainless steel pole (4 sections) and I only have a 2ft pvc pipe to cement into the ground and the pole drops into that.
- pasky
Friday, June 21, 2013 at 11:12 AM

I would like to make a pad for a shed which would be 10ft x 10ft and would like too know how many bags of Aggregate and cement I would need ? Many thanx
- Smiler
Saturday, June 22, 2013 at 3:30 PM

Pasky, I would still be concerned that 2 feet is not sufficient for the depth, especially for a flag pole when you consider the wind as well.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, June 24, 2013 at 8:53 AM

Smiler, the amount of concrete you will need will depend on the thickness of the slab but lets say you are going 4" deep, thats a typical slab thickness. A general purpose concrete mix formula is a 1:2:3 mix, 1 part portland cement (94 lbs.), 2 parts general purpose sand (160-180 lbs.)and 3 parts gravel or stone (240-300 lbs.). If you are doing a custom mix you will need 8 94 lb. bags of portland cement along with the aggregate. Each 94 lb. bag of portland cement makes 4.5 cubic feet of concrete. Or if you want a premixed material like the High Strength Concrete Mix or 5000 Plus you will need 56 80lb bags.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, June 24, 2013 at 10:21 AM

One gripe I have about your quick slab for an outside door landing is the excavation. While the beastie is small enough that bad habits won't hurt you, when you loosely redistribute dirt where you've over-dug the elevation you wanted. you're way better off using more gravel to make it up than kicking it back into place. A general contractor myself, I just watched a crew next door spend the better part of a week wetting and compacting soil back in place after they dug past their elevation. The contractor, soils engineer, architect, and city inspector wouldn't have had it any other way. If somebody extrapolated your demo the do their own larger slab, please tell them about moisture & vapor barriers.
- Jeff Thompson
Thursday, August 8, 2013 at 4:37 PM

How many bags of sakrete 60lb bags do I need for a 7x5 floor that is 5 inches deep?
- Jesus
Saturday, August 17, 2013 at 7:37 PM

I have an existing concrete stoop at my front door that sits on a concrete slab. The stoop is 8'wide, 2'deep, and 1.5' high and has 8 inch high steps only on the short sides. I would like to add a step to the long side. The step would be 8'wide, 1' deep and 8 inches high. I am concerned about bonding the new concrete to the existing concrete slab and the front of the stoop. All the existing concrete is about 20 years old but in good shape. Can you give me any suggestions on getting a good bond? Thanks.
- Howard
Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 10:21 AM

Jesus, for an area 7' x 5' x 5" you will need 33 60lb bags of Sakrete Concrete Mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 12:47 PM

Howard, for your application would that step be placed over existing concrete or would it be over earth? When it comes to applying the step beside the existing concrete it would best to tie the two sections together. This is usually done by epoxying rebar into the existing concrete which will hold the new concrete in place.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 at 5:13 PM

Thanks Dean. The step will be placed over existing concrete that is about 20 years old, but in good shape. I was thinking about cutting an opening about 4 inches wide by about 48 inches long in the existing concrete to create a "key" to also hold the step in place. Then do I need to apply something to the existing concrete to bond the new step to the old concrete? Thanks again.
- Howard
Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 7:05 AM

It would be beneficial to either use a bonding agent like the Bonder & Fortifier or you can also do a slurry coat and while it is still fresh apply the concrete mix.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 9:49 AM

Do I need a bonding agent for my project? I am filling holes (45") for deck supports. I am going to fill the first 1/2 of the hole, then the second 1/2 with tube forms. If there is a few days delay between the 2 halves, do I still need a bonding agent? I also plan on placing a few pieces of rebar in the first pour to join the two halves together. OR, would it be better to pout the footing in one pour?
- Fritz
Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at 11:18 PM

Fritz, I would recommend pouring the footer all at once, that way you will have one solid footer.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 10:42 AM

How much would it cost to put in a small slab for a headstone about?
- kristen
Thursday, September 5, 2013 at 7:31 PM

Kristen, the cost will depend on the size of the slab. We have a concrete calculator tool listed at the top of the page which will tell you how many bags you need for the specific size of the slab. Then once you determine how many bags are needed please check with your local retailer of Sakrete products and they can assist you with pricing.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, September 6, 2013 at 4:34 PM

how many sq meters pf concrete do i need to fill a sq I = meter deep by 16 meter sq
- andrew
Wednesday, September 18, 2013 at 2:02 AM

Andrew, if you have an area that is 16 square meters and you have a depth of 1 meter you will need 16 cubic meters of concrete, or if you go with bags you would need 942 80lb bags.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, September 18, 2013 at 10:39 AM

How many 60 or 80lb bag will I need for a 6'x12'x4" slab thanks
- Nick
Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 6:36 PM

Nick, for a 6'x12'x4" slab you will need either (40) 80lb bags or (54) 60lb bags.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, September 30, 2013 at 7:54 AM

I need to know,what is 49ft long 16in deep and 12in wide
- bert
Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 2:04 PM

Bert, for that size area you will need 109 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete Mix or if you are using the Maximizer you would need 66 80lb bags.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 10:37 AM

I need to know how many bags do I need on a 12in x 18in x73feet long
- jesus chavez
Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 6:59 AM

Jesus, for an area that is 73 feet long, 12 inches wide and 18 inches deep you will need 183 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 9:37 AM

How many yards of cement would it take for a slab 6" x 19' x 69' footer 6" x 8" 70'
- Nora
Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Great blog, thanks for the help!
- Maggie
Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 11:55 PM

Nora, if you have a slab that is 69ft x 19ft x 6 in thick you will need 1093 80lb bags or 24.3 cubic yards of concrete. For the footers that are 70ft x 8in x 6in you will need 40 80lb bags or .87 cubic yards of concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Friday, November 15, 2013 at 9:53 AM

How man yards of gravel will I need for a wall 12" wide x 4' feel high ?
- Rick
Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at 9:30 PM

Rick, do you know how long the wall will be? Also, where are you planning on using the gravel in this application?
Dean - Tech Service Team
Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 2:40 PM

i want extend my patio that measures 15 feet by 6 feet wide about 4-6 inches deep homy bags will Ineed
- wally
Sunday, February 9, 2014 at 4:13 PM

Wally, if you are making a 15' x 6' slab 4 inches deep you will need 50 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete, and if you go 6 inches deep you will need 75 80lb bags of Sakrete Concrete.
Dean - Tech Service Team
Monday, February 10, 2014 at 9:47 AM

I need to make weights for a tent. I am thinking about 6 inch pvc 48 inches long. I need to have weights weigh 50 pounds or more each. How much concrete will I need to achieve this?
- Geof
Friday, March 7, 2014 at 1:40 PM

Geof, It will take 1.3 80 lb bags of concrete to fill a 6" dia. by 48" long pvc. It should weight in excess of 100 lbs. not counting the weight of the pvc. So if you were to cut that in half you should be over the 50 lb mark.
- RLC -Tech Service Team
Friday, March 7, 2014 at 4:36 PM

how many cubic meters of concrete would I need if I had to build a bridge that is 24 meters long?
- nigga
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 8:11 AM

For a project such as this you may have to consult a structural engineer to get the exact numbers you are wanting. You are going to need a lot more details and calculations than your typical L' x W' x D" calculation. If you need some preliminary numbers you can use the calculator on this website, which can be found at the top of this page on the right hand side.
- CAE - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 9:30 AM

how many sacks of secrete for 12'x16' 4'' thick
- kelly
Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 2:37 PM

Kelly, It would take 107 80lb bags or 143 60lb bags to fill that area.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:44 AM

My side porch (8x16) has sunk & cracked right in the middle about 1- 1.5 inch deep. Edges are fine. My questions are: 1)Can I raise this and blend it to the edge of the existing concrete? 2)How deep does the new concrete have to be? 3)And which type of Sakrete do you recommend for this?
- Chuck
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 1:33 AM

Chuck, Yes you can raise this area back up to the existing concrete. First you must clean the area that you are going to apply the material to. You cannot have any paints, sealers, dust, or debris present. Then you can use the Fast setting Cement Patcher. It can be applied from 1/2" to 2". Once the material is firm enough to where you can no longer disturb it then apply either Sakrete Flo-Coat Concrete Resurfacer or Top-N-Bond Concrete Patcher. These materials can be placed from 1/2" to a featheredge. You can also skim coat the other areas so that all of the concrete will match in color.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Thursday, March 27, 2014 at 8:35 AM

Hi Dean, now that winter is over, we are continuing work on our small front porch. My husband needs to pour a 4" slab next. I'm curious why some places say the cement:sand:gravel ratio is 1:2:4 and others (Sakrete?) say 1:2:3. Also, is that ratio purely the weight of each material or is it also related to volume or density? Thanks!
- Wendy
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 10:10 PM

Wendy, a 1:2:4 mix is a very lean mix and would not be one that we would recommend. The ratio is by equal weight of each material. So if you had a 94 lb bag of cement you would need 188 lbs of sand and 282 lbs of gravel. Good luck with your project.
- RLC - Tech Service Team
Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 9:36 AM

Thanks. My husband ended up buying the pre-mixed bags. I asked him to promise to minimize slump ( having noticed that others add too much water so it is easier to mix). Well, he went to the extreme and told me they mixed it so there was no slump at all! Now I'm noticing on the edge of the finished slab that at the bottom, there are crevices where it was not possible for the concrete to lie flat because there wasn't enough liquid. What are the potential problems down the road? The slab will be covered on top ith bluestone and bricks will be laid up along the side.
- Wendy
Monday, April 7, 2014 at 6:58 PM

My husband mixed the concrete for a 4" slab so there was almost no slump at all. I'm noticing on the edge of the finished slab that at the bottom, there are crevices where it was not possible for the concrete to lie flat because there wasn't enough liquid. What are the potential problems down the road? The slab will be covered on top ith bluestone and bricks will be laid up along the side. Also, is it a problem if brick mortar is mixed without enough water? Lastly, what is the maximum acceptable distance between bricks. It is just a 2' wall set against a concrete slab. Thanks.
- Wendy
Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 5:16 PM

Wendy, your potential problems include the slab not being strong enough and possible point load issues. You always want to make sure you have enough water for the mix to hydrate and cure correctly. Typically the mortar joints between bricks are approximately 3/8” to ½”.
- Chris Germain Technical Services
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 9:55 AM

Thanks. How do I know it is sufficiently hydrated and cured? There must have been some slump since it was two guys who mixed by hand...
- Wendy
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Wendy, If the material is getting hard it is sufficiently hydrated and cured.
- Chris Germain Technical Services
Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 8:05 AM

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